Is the space between brick siding and exterior wall necessary?

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  #1  
Old 10-26-18, 09:26 PM
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Is the space between brick siding and exterior wall necessary?

We live in a brick sided home about 40 yards from the train tracks. Our exterior wall behind the brick is actually concrete cinder block. I’ve heard of filling it with foam and that it can ruin the sheathing, but this house has nothing between the whole brick siding and the cinder block. We’ve replaced all the exterior doors and windows and the trains are still unbearable. What else can we do, besides move? We’re already selling the house.
 
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Old 10-26-18, 09:30 PM
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Location?

We live in SW Missouri in case climate comes into play.
 
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Old 10-26-18, 09:48 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Filling what with foam....... the cinder blocks ?
There wouldn't be enough space between the brick and the block to even consider filling it with foam.

At that distance I'd doubt there was much of anything you could do to reduce the effect of the train.
 
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Old 10-27-18, 03:43 AM
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I know several people who live in very close proximity of the tracks (and the neighborhoods are nice) and you just get use to it. They residents don't even realize the trains coming through anymore. As visitor, we always comment when a train comes by but they just shrug and say they don't even hear it any more.

Planting lots of trees (pine and or popular are good choices) can help muffle and reduce some of the noise.
 
  #5  
Old 10-27-18, 06:06 AM
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We’ve been living here almost 15 years. There’s no getting used to the trains. There is an 1 1/2” to 2” of space between the brick and cinder blocks. More than enough space for a sprayable foam if it can be done.
 
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Old 10-27-18, 07:00 AM
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Normally there isn't that much space between the wall and the back of the brick. How would you propose getting an even coat of foam between the two? Also spray foam can exert a good amount of pressure so if it was applied too heavy in some spots it could try and force the brick outward.
 
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Old 10-27-18, 10:44 AM
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBO_4kPP4kI

Brick /2 inch cavity /block is a common form of construction here, and the cavities are often retro filled for thermal insulation rather than sound.
The cavity is really to prevent damp reaching the inner skin
 
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Old 10-27-18, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by jdviefhaus
We’re already selling the house.
If you're selling the house, then don't change anything.
That's the biggest mistake I see from Sellers, they want to "fix" something that bugs THEM, but which the new buyer doesn't care about.

Let the next owner worry about it.
 
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Old 10-27-18, 02:47 PM
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We appreciate all the responses. We just know that the people who have seen our home loved the house, the huge shop and the 10 acres m/l, but the trains were the issue. To see our property to get an idea of what we’re talking about go to alanandkimhomes.com and the mls is #60114373.
 
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Old 10-27-18, 03:44 PM
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Beautiful house and a nice area. You can't eliminate the train noise. Most people will learn to live with it. But like I said lots of trees will go a long way in muffling the train noise. The friends I mentioned previously live just as close to the tracks as you. The best you can do to help sell the house, if buyer are being put off by the train is to explain that you planned on planting trees to help mitigate the noise. How often does the train go by? Daily, hourly? Price reduction can also entice the buyers. What was the enticement when you bought the home? That's what you must try to enhance or make known. Try to get time table of the train schedule. then try to show the house when it's scheduled to come through.
 
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Old 10-27-18, 11:23 PM
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Can't believe how cheap the houses are compared to ours.
 
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Old 10-28-18, 04:52 AM
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This is similar to living near an airport. Here in Western New York, the Town of Cheetowaga, almost as big as the city it's a suburb to, is the location of the Buffalo Niagara International Airport. The airport is in the middle of the residential area, not on the outskirts or rural part of town. People have learned to live next to it and don't even hear them anymore. House values are minimally affected and very few people complain about it.
 
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Old 10-28-18, 10:43 AM
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A brick/block cavity wall like you have is a darn good wall for stopping sound! Without getting real technical, you have a wall right now with an STC in the mid-50's. Adding foam in the cavity will add very little to the sound rating. I would also be concerned about affecting the water penetration performance of the wall if you foam the cavity. The cavity is there so that moisture penetrating the wall will drain down the interior face of the brick and weep out at the bottom; adding foam would tend to hold the moisture and create potentially serious issues. Assuming, of course, the wall was built correctly.

Quite a few years ago people who lived in the flight path of our airport began complaining loud enough about aircraft noise that the airport commission did studies on what to do about sound control. What was finally done that was most effective for controlling sound was window replacement with special sound reduction windows and weatherstripping doors. If that's already been done, I'm not sure how much more can be done.
 
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Old 10-28-18, 11:00 AM
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What was finally done that was most effective for controlling sound was window replacement with special sound reduction windows and weatherstripping doors.
With reference to the post about the home and the close proximity of the train, this also is a good way to reduce the noise.
 
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Old 10-28-18, 08:30 PM
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The air gap between the two allows water to drain down without the inner wall getting wet.
 
  #16  
Old 10-29-18, 08:00 PM
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We put in new windows and doors about 2 years ago. Don’t know what else to do. Almost wish a tornado would take out the house so we could collect the insurance and run.
 
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