10x8 shed slab

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Old 07-11-19, 05:31 AM
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10x8 shed slab

I will be pouring my first slab (10' x 8' and 4.5" deep) for a shed foundation this weekend. I have not purchased the concrete yet, and I am looking online and I see all kinds of options... as someone not very familiar with the different concrete types I see that I can go with quikrete or just normal concrete mix. do you all think I will be fine using quikrete or will it set too fast, and will it be as durable? It's just a small plastic shed that weighs around 400lbs and only going to be holding my lawn mower, shovels, rakes, wheel barrow, things like that...

As far as rebar goes should I purchase the rebar mesh or sheet or should I just purchase individual bars (and how thick of rebar?) and lay them in the grid pattern?

I've read I should go above the ground slightly with the slab so water wont drain right over it, but how high should I go? 1/2", 1"?

I appreciate any help and guidance you can provide as this is my first time laying the concrete. I am having the area dug and compacted by a professional company so that part is already getting taken care of today.

Thanks
 
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Old 07-11-19, 05:59 AM
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IMO you should be getting redI mix from a concrete company. Some have 1.25 yard dump trailers for just such a project. (Like this, for example). Just get 2 pc of 42x84 mesh rebar and lay it so it doesn't protrude. As you pour, hook it and pull it up so it stays in the center of your pour. For ease of weed trimming and to ensure water doesn't come in, I would probably put the pad 1 1/2" above grade.

Verify how your shed will be anchored before you get too far.
 
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Old 07-11-19, 06:01 AM
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That's a lot of concrete for a DIY project. Are you mixing it yourself ( I hope you are renting a mixer) or having a truck bring it in? There's another option around here. A place called "U-Pour-It" fills a large dump-able trailer and you tow it home and back. Talk to a concrete company or maybe the city about the strength of the mix you need.
I think metal mesh is fine for your purpose. Is frost heave an issue where you live? Ask the experts.
Have you looked into permits? Concrete is a permanent structure so your taxes will go up. I put my 6'X8' shed on a wooden platform so it is a temporary structure for the past 20 years.
 
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Old 07-11-19, 08:06 AM
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First, have you contacted your local zoning and inspections departments? If not it would be a good idea. In many areas pouring concrete makes your shed a permenant structure which may mean zoning approval, site drawings, following setback requirements...

Have you ever mixed concrete from a bag? It's a lot of work to do by hand so if going that way you'll need several helpers to keep things moving fast enough to get cold joints between your many, many batches. A mixer will help. One of the small ones sold by big box stores for a few hundred dollars is better than hand mixing but still very marginal for a job that size. Better would be to rent a gas powered mixer so you can mix bigger batches.

But... the best would be to have a ready mix truck bring the concrete. Check with your local companies as many have minimums. In my area it's either 2 or 3 yards. You can get less but you'll be paying for the minimum amount or paying a small batch fee. Also contact concrete contractors to see if they can squeeze in a small job. My guy has no minimum with the concrete company and he gets a better price than I would as a stranger so his price including setting up and taking down the forms is about what I'd pay just for the concrete.
 
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Old 07-11-19, 10:43 AM
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Thanks for the replies and advice, I'll actually have two other people helping mix and pour the cement with me - sorry for not making that more clear.

I really appreciate the pointers on the local building codes about using cement, that's something I had not considered. Looking online for the structure permit I noticed this tidbit:

"A building permit is required for accessory structures, except for one story detached accessory structures used as sheds, playhouses, and similar small buildings that are 120 square feet or less in floor area". I was planning to pull permits tonight so I that saves me a trip. There was some more details in there about using concrete but that was all surrounding the minimum thickness we must use and things like that.

So I think I am good on that front. I did get quotes for the ready mix stuff and it was about triple what it would cost me to do the bagged concrete, and I figure with three people and the 10x8 at 4" deep instead of 4.5" it's 20 bags per person... definitely going to be sore afterwards but I think it's manageable.
 
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Old 07-11-19, 10:51 AM
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You might want to double check the need for a permit. Locally we don't need a permit for any shed that is 100 sq ft or less unless it has a permanent foundation. In other words it can set on blocks or posts but if you pour a slab or block up a foundation you are supposed to go thru the permit process.
 
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Old 07-11-19, 11:08 AM
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Every area is different but my community it's anything under 200 sq ft is good to go and doesn't mater what type of foundation!

4800# of cement, get the Advil out!
 
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Old 07-11-19, 11:12 AM
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It's 60 sixty pound bags at 4". 4 1/2" is 12.5% more volume. So you need at least 68 sacks of #60, assuming your grading is perfectly 4.5" deep. Have several 5 gallon buckets... you will want them to distribute the concrete at some point. And you need to keep mixing the new with the old on the ground to avoid the cold joint. Be sure you measure your water each time to get a consistent mix. And you'll be sorry if you're a couple bags short. If you have extra, pour a pad in front of the doors.

Not something I would want to do. Been there done that.

And from post #1, Quikrete is a brand name... not a type of mix.
 
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Old 07-12-19, 05:06 AM
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And dont forget to add in your contraction joints/saw cuts to control when, not if, it finally cracks!
 
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Old 07-12-19, 05:28 AM
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I don't think there would be any need to cut an area that is only 8x10. That's about the size a driveway pad is cut. It would need a cut if its length was >1.5x it's width. (If it was longer than 8x12 it would need a sawcut.) Concrete only needs expansion joints if it isn't close to square. If it cracks elsewhere that's poor compaction or poor drainage.
 
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Old 07-12-19, 05:31 AM
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I only have one bay in my shop/barn that has concrete, 14x24. It was poured 4" thick about 22 yrs ago and still doesn't have any cracks. The ground below was well compacted. I also don't see any need for a relief cuts in a small slab.
 
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Old 07-15-19, 03:58 AM
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Thanks for all the help and advice. On Friday I got the form created, dug a little footing around the form, and did some additional grading to the area that I had compacted. The rebar we used was a little too long so it had to be cut - my dad and brother were at my house helping me and the grinding plate literally shattered as we tried to cut the rebar, almost took my dads thumb off! 4-5 stitches later we got back at it. My brother and I mixed up 53 80lb bags and my dad and wife did the "smoothing"/shaking the form part. It turned out really good for a first time project I think, so again, thank you guys for all the help and advice. Now time to build the shed...........
 
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