Passing conduit through masonry wall. how to patch?

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Old 07-28-19, 08:08 AM
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Passing conduit through masonry wall. how to patch?

i need to bring either 1 or 2 (more on that later) conduits through a masonry wall made of 1 course of hollow brick (like this one http://www.buildkar.com/wp-content/u...llow-Brick.jpg) with stucco on the outside and plaster on the inside .

After I make the hole what should I do to fill in around the conduit? Mortar, premixed quick set concrete? This is not a part of the house which is externally visble and the inside is a utilitarian space so I’m not that concerned about aesthetics, just durability, waterproofness not propagating damage to surrounding stucco, etc.

should I wrap the conduit in anything?

Also is any reason to angle the slightly or can it go straight through?

Final question, I need to pass 3 ethernet cables that are going to go in 2 separate directions. Would it be better to pass 2 conduits (3/4 and 1) or a single 1.25” to an exterior mounted box and then split off from there?
 
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Old 07-28-19, 01:53 PM
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Depending on how large the hole is and the gap you need to fill you could use anything from cualk to mortar. Concrete is not appropriate because of the aggregate/rocks.

What is your conduit made of? If it's plastic I wouldn't do anything. If it's regular EMT you could use a plastic sleeve to help prevent corrosion.

I like to slope exterior wall penetrations slightly downhill so any water will naturally flow outside.

I don't know specifically what cable you are using but I don't know why you'd need 1 1/4" unless you just want the extra room and the same goes for your two conduit idea. That's a lot of conduit space for just three Ethernet cables unless you meant six. At my shop I currently have two cat 6 cables running through 1/2".
 
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Old 07-28-19, 05:51 PM
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I'm going use to use EMT.

As for how large the hole is going to be, well Ideally it'd be just slightly larger than the conduit but since I don't have a hammer drill powerful enough to use a masonry hole saw, I'm planing on drilling a starter hole and then using a chisel and hammer which is a little less precise.

I have bags of sand, lime and Portland cement left over from a recent project (all still in good condition I'd guess), what proportions should I go with for a mortar to seal it up and hold it in place?

As for why I need such a big conduit, 2 of the 3 wires are cat6a which have an OD of .305" which is about double your standard cat5e
 
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Old 07-29-19, 04:49 AM
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There are many recipes for mortar so it's pretty hard to screw-up. The simplest is 3 parts sand to one part Portland cement. If you want to use lime then a common mix is 6 parts sand, 2 parts lime, one part Portland cement.
 
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Old 08-03-19, 06:55 AM
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Ok so i made a bit of a mess of it but I think it will work, I went with the 6:2:1 you suggested

Right behind where the hole and junction box is a water tank that was 6” from the end of the chisel at the beginning which gave me a 4” swing with my hammer turned sideways.

I should have given up and moved the hole 8” to the side to clear the tank after seeing how useless that
was but I got in a mind set of “well I’ve gone this far” and it ended up taking me an hour to make the hole.










 
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