How would you unpitch the pitch?

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Old 12-13-19, 08:07 PM
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How would you unpitch the pitch?

Hello all! First post. So how would you recommend I do this...

My problem
I just moved into this shop, I've got a 6 year lease, and I'll probably buy it before the 6 years is up. The floors are pitched for draining and it drives me nuts. They're pitched too much. It's got an elevation of at least 4 inches in different areas, and to make things worse there's an uneven concrete walkway along the entire shop by the walls. I want to level the entire floor out...

1. Can I level this in sections by bringing the concrete to a higher level in one area and matching everything else at jts hight over the next year? The reason I'd have to do it in pieces is because of cost and because I need to use the shop for work too. I can't afford to have it emptied out or unused for a few days.

2. Can I frame out a room first for a project I need to begin working on and then pour the concrete later? The room in question will be a paint room with an overhead drive in door. This spring I'm going to install a spray booth inside it. I need the floors level for this, and for level drying racks for when we pour table top epoxy and need it to self level.

3. Is it cheaper and ok to frame the floor heavy duty (because cars will parked and jacked up) and add plywood and tile it? I know the tiles makes it more expensive but I was planning in tiling or adding some kind of flooring over the concrete anyway.

Where the cars are is where I'm building the room. Photos below.

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Last edited by PJmax; 01-01-20 at 11:31 AM. Reason: convertred links/added pics from links
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  #2  
Old 12-14-19, 05:37 AM
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First, since you are renting you need to get permission in writing from the landlord BEFORE beginning any work. Make sure it is clearly stated what changes you will be making to the property.

Honestly, I think my first choice would be to look for a different shop or just live with the floor you have. If this shop is "the one" then I'd consider pouring an overlay or self leveling to level the floors but... 4" is a lot and you've got a huge area. You will have to look carefully at what raising the floor will do. You really don't want to have concrete poured up against any wood framed partition walls.
 
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Old 12-14-19, 10:29 AM
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Yeah that's a good point in regards to the weight being stacked.

Getting another another shop isn't an option though. I'm planning on buying this building and preserving it since it was the very first chrysler dealership in Illinois. I think the second in the country. It's also in a very historic part of Chicago next to the lake.

In going to have to figure out how to level the ground in sections because this time next year I'll have to have all level floors for production. For the time being I can monkey it with with shims under tables haha.

The other thing I need to do is figure out the true change in elevation. Maybe two itches of concrete will work and I'll keep the very center of the warehouse pitched for drainage. Not sure yet.

Maybe framing the entire floor with ipe and plywood, then some kind of hard rubber snap tile. Is the way to go.

Either way I'm sure itl be $8k + 😅
 
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Old 12-14-19, 11:14 AM
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Before doing anything I would spend an hour or two with a laser or water level and check the floors in the whole place so you can come up with a plan. You don't want to level/raise the floor in one area to cause a problem or trip hazard somewhere else. The good thing is if you are covering the floor with rubber mats or some other covering, cracking of a thin leveling layer of concrete won't be the end of the world.
 
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Old 12-14-19, 11:17 AM
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Rent a transit and measuring rod if you want to map out the floor elevations.
 
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Old 01-01-20, 10:13 AM
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self-leveling cements are not used for final surfaces since they're likely to randomly crack,,, you might consider using grout after diamond grinding,,, likely you'll need a transit mix truck & conc pump,,, you could do it by hand but its mucho work & not a 1man job for an inexperienced diy'er impo
 
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