Are you able to grind down a patio to change the pitch?


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Old 01-05-20, 03:05 AM
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Are you able to grind down a patio to change the pitch?

Hi All,
I recently sold a home which I rehabbed and the new owners have called me with water in their bedroom. It seems (we rehabbed this house during the dry months so it wasn't an issue), that the large and very thick concrete patio (25'x15'x12') is pitched towards the house and is at almost the same level as the sliding glass doors. During heavy rain, water is getting into the house. It is in Florida, so there's no basement.

My question is, are you able to grind the concrete so that it is pitched differently? Or would drains installed near the sliders do the trick?

Thank you.
 
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Old 01-05-20, 04:29 AM
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Almost the same level as the sliding doors Do you have a 1 inch step to door or is it less? If you have room there are ways to raise the patio slab. One is a foam that is pumped under the patio and it will raise the slab.
 
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Old 01-05-20, 04:44 AM
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There is equipment that can grind the surface but your talking highway type equipment so it would be prohibitive for home use, plus the surface would be ruined.

is pitched towards the house and is at almost the same level as the sliding glass doors.
Mud jacking as mentioned is a possibility but you indicate that your level already.

Sounds like a demo job!
 
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Old 01-05-20, 06:53 AM
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pitched towards the house and is at almost the same level as the sliding glass doors.
Which is why they are asking about grinding it DOWN not raising it up!

No, grinding is not an option. Why in the world is it 12" thick??? Sounds like tear out and start over.
 
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Old 01-05-20, 09:14 AM
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Building rule 101, never ever have any form of slab, deck, stoop any closer then 2" ( 6" in snow areas) of any door opening!
And never have any of these in direct contact with the siding.
You may get lucky and by removing the whole door and this time add a sill pan and proper flashing to stop the leaking.
Jamsill Guard Door and Window Sill Pan Flashing.
 
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Old 01-05-20, 09:38 AM
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This is a major problem since it is getting through the sliding doors the odds are high that is also getting under other sections of the wall and will rot out the bottom plate.

One possible solution is to cut the concrete about 6 to 8 inches from the wall, chip out the concrete down at least 6 inches and create a drain channel.
Not ideal but it should at least keep water out of the bottom plate,
 
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Old 01-05-20, 09:41 AM
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My suggestion is to place a drain into the patio near the house the entire width of the patio. It would be best to angle the drain so it flows toward both sides rather than having all the water drain to one side.

You may have to remove a 25X1X1 section of the patio but it's possible the drain may be installed without removing the entire 1' depth of the patio. Install a French drain at each end and make it sufficient to handle the water a Florida storm can provide.

Also, make certain the water from the roof doesn't run onto the patio.
 
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Old 01-06-20, 02:00 AM
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One possible solution is to cut the concrete about 6 to 8 inches from the wall, chip out the concrete down at least 6 inches and create a drain channel.
All the new construction houses I painted in fla back in the 80s and 90s had the bottom of the sliders recessed in the concrete although it wasn't over an inch deep.
 
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Old 01-06-20, 12:15 PM
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Oh my! You are all so very helpful! I was thinking that putting a drain is the only way to go, besides a demo. I don't own the house anymore as I flipped it, but I am not the kind of flipper that is trying to screw new owners over so I'd like to help if I can.

We do have gutters all around the patio and yes the patio is absurdly thick! The former owner was a builder supposedly and did lots of work himself. You know how that goes....haha.

Thank you so much for your insight.
 
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Old 01-07-20, 12:03 AM
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andreab27, good to see you're going with the drain. I suggest speaking with someone local who can tell you what you need, but my calculation shows you'll probably need a drain capable of handling 30 gallons of water per minute considering the downpours in Florida (assuming Miami, which has rainfall rates of 4.7" per hour) and the 625 square foot area of the patio. This would include a 3" pipe. in terms of size
 

Last edited by Tony P.; 01-07-20 at 03:01 AM.
 

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