Types of concrete material driveway and cost

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Old 02-17-20, 07:13 PM
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Types of concrete material driveway and cost

Hi,

We are in the very early process of building a home. The type of concrete driveway surface is a topic I haven't been able to find enough information on. (Every google search result discusses concrete vs. asphalt vs gravel, but I'm pretty sure I'm trying to find types of concrete driveway surfaces).

Our current home has a driveway with a texture of multiple small pebbles embedded into the surface (see the attached photo). We're looking for a smooth concrete surface. Is there a name for each of these types, and is there a cost difference between the two? Are there advantages to one type over the other, in terms of durability, etc?

Appreciate any input.
 
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Old 02-17-20, 09:53 PM
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That looks to be a form of 'exposed aggregate" finish. My version of exposed aggregate in my driveway has more rounded smooth pebbles than yours. Just from a personal observation, exposed aggregate finish is hard on the bare feet (as I get older) than a broom finish (another finish/google it). Broom is easier to work on (smoother).

Exposed agg finish is created by washing away the top cream as the concrete is setting up. I would guess it would be slightly more costly than broom as it is an additional step and wait time, but just a guess.

You can also google stamped concrete to get info on another finish. This is def more costly than the previous two. Much more difficult to work on due to the irregular surface. Also usually requires periodic maintainance with a sealer.
 
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Old 02-17-20, 10:37 PM
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Thanks, that led me down the right path for searching. Yes, looks like I'm looking for a broom finish instead of my existing exposed aggregate. Also seems like a broom finish is a tad cheaper that the exposed aggregate.
 
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Old 02-17-20, 10:40 PM
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Also seems like a broom finish wouldn't be more expensive that the exposed aggregate, and possibly cheaper.
I think you will find it to be just the opposite!
 
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Old 02-18-20, 06:51 PM
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Really? How so? Every source I found quoted exposed aggregate as more expensive than broom finish.
 
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Old 02-18-20, 08:06 PM
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Now that you mention that (again just thinking this in my head) with a broom finish, you have to make sure the surface is just right before you broom it. I've done small broom pours, never exposed agg. I'm guessing you don't have to be as picky on the initial finish when you going to wash off the top, thus less labor. Is that why?
 
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Old 02-19-20, 01:12 AM
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You can do it yourself too and really save money. The best things about driveways is that they are flat, and do not have a lot of heavy loads on them. Equally, they do not require a lot of tools either.



The easiest way is to lay out where your driveway is going, then calculate how much concrete you will need based on length, width and depth. Then have the gravel hauled in and spread it out to the depth you want, say 6 inches thick. Then figure out how many bags of cement you will need (94 pounds of Portland cement at 4 bags to the cubic yard) and spread that over the gravel. If you want really strong concrete, go with 5 bags or even 6 bags to the cubic yard.



To mix, just use a rototiller set for 6 inches deep.



At that point you can just wait for the moisture in the air/ground to harden the mix into concrete, or you can apply water and mix up the wet mixture with the rototiller again. If you want to trowel and then broom finish the concrete, that is up to you, just work in small sections.


If a person does not have a rototiller, they can often be rented or borrowed.


Concrete made this way is about half of what it costs to buy it from a ready-made truck, and about 25% of the cost of having a contractor do it for you.
 
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