Request feedback on repair plan for degraded foundation parging

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Old 02-24-20, 05:32 PM
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Request feedback on repair plan for degraded foundation parging

Removed degraded/loose foundation parging using roto-hammer/chisel (4hr).
Photos show removed parging, and the exposed degraded mortar joints.
House: Split Level, 47 years old, Northeast US, approx 40" of foundation exposed entire perimeter.
Same repair will be performed on another side. Other walls are in better shape.
Appreciate feedback for following plan that is based on internet info:
  • Verify all loose parging removed, and all loose joint mortar removed.
  • Powerwash wall.
  • Apply Type S mortar to degraded joints.
  • Apply Thorobond or Acryl 60 bonding agent to wall with brush.
  • Apply parging (Quickcrete Fiber Cement or Thoroseal) on a cloudy day.
  • Spray water to keep curing mortar damp approx 24hr.
  • Allow parging to cure 30 days of warm weather, then apply concrete sealer (water repellent).
Q's:
  • Removed about half the parging. Should I consider taking considerable extra time to remove remaining well-adhered parging? Would "clean slate" greatly improve repair quality and longevity? (ie: time req'd worthwhile?) Goal = quality/longevity: at my age, won't be DIY much longer
  • If leave adhered parging, is repair done in 2 layers, feathering the first to level of original parging then applying a final thin coat to cover the entire wall?
  • Would a 2nd coat require a prior 2nd application of bonding agent?
  • 3/8" total max depth for parging, regardless of # of layers applied?
  • Any concern working around power cable to A/C unit along bottom edge of vinyl siding? Removing brackets would require supporting cable with notched boards, or other Rube Goldberg setup.
  • Replace 30% of water used to mix into mortar with liquid bonding agent to boost resilience?
  • Is this parging repair a good DIY project, or better left to a pro after I prep walls?
Thanks for your time!
Surfin
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Old 02-25-20, 07:02 PM
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"24HR No Reply Bump"
Feedback/comments appreciated.
THX
 
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Old 02-27-20, 09:46 AM
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Thread viewed 130 times -no responses.
Is the problem how I presented my Q and related info?
I've done concrete repair, but never parging or parging repair-
Therefore since this repair is mostly cosmetic and highly visible, want to verify done right.

Thanks For Your Time!
 
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Old 02-28-20, 06:56 PM
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HELLO out there!?
After 4 days and 186 views, surprised still just crickets(?)
Have posted a number of Q's over several years, and appreciated timely help received.
Obviously, nobody is obligated to reply. Don't know if there's less engagement on this board, or what's up.

Feedback/comments from anyone with parging experience appreciated!
Thanks For Your Time
 
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Old 02-29-20, 02:18 AM
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Your plan sounds ok but I'm a painter not a mason. As far as I know the only time a bonding agent is needed is when you apply the stucco/mortar over painted masonry.
 
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Old 02-29-20, 05:07 AM
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marksr, thanks for your reply -though as you noted this topic is not in your wheelhouse!
Upvoted for trying

Notice you're the moderator. Assume there's a concrete forum moderator with related experience?

Feedback/comments from anyone with parging experience appreciated!
Thanks For Your Time
 
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Old 02-29-20, 05:34 PM
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You are on the right track except for one thing. Your acryl 60 or any other acrylic is actually a bond breaker. Use Weld Crete for a bonding agent. As someone said, if everything is clean as it should be if you pressure wash it might not be necessary. Bonding agent is good insurance. You can use or Acryl 60 to fortify your mix. If you use it you must use it in all your coats. Remind me what Thorobond is. Is Thoro still in business or have they been swallowed up by another company?

I lost patience reading your original post. I think you are just asking too much from most of us. Not that we don't know, we do. Just got tired reading.
 
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Old 02-29-20, 06:22 PM
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tightcoat, thanks for your recommendation to use Weld Crete as bonding agent. Will look into that.

Thorobond (your requested info): http://www.thoro.com/fileadmin/datab...THORO_BOND.pdf
OP noted that the process and products (ie: Thorobond/Acryl 60) not my ideas.
Just used what appeared to be best Googled info. Open to any expert advice for changes.

Regarding your comment on post length, suppose it's a fine line between not enough/too much info.
If easier for you or other experts, just consider Q as:

Please view photos and provide a recommendation how to repair the degraded joints and parging.

Thanks for your time!
 
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Old 03-02-20, 08:13 AM
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Okay, I read the link on Thorobond. It is a bonding agent like Weld Crete. You can use that as a bonding agent. Acryl 60 has a different purpose. Acryl 60 or its kin is good for strengthening and crack reduction and as a partial water replacement for cement mortars and the like.

I did not address the issue of the mortar joints in the block. A mason might have a different idea but I think I would judiciously use a grinder and take some of the mortar out and then use a grout bag to squeeze new mortar into the joints, tool them off let them cure a while then apply the stucco. If you don't mind seieng cracks through your parge coat you can forego pointing up the mortar. And frankly, it might crack anyway. Parging is just a cover it does not add appreciable strength or reinforcement.
 
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Old 03-02-20, 11:44 AM
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Thanks tightcoat-
Goal is a quality, long lasting product -ie: do it right, not just a cover-up that, as you said, will not last.
Therefore do plan to clean up the joints best I can, then fill with Type S mortar before parging. Thanks for the grout bag idea to fill the joints, hadn't considered that.

Thanks for your time!
 
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Old 03-02-20, 01:42 PM
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Smile

Is your existing finish sprayed on? From your photos it looks like it might be. If you want a glld texture match you can rent a spray outfit -- a hopper gun and compressor and spray it. Or if you ahve a compressor with enough volume -- it takes good output but not a lot of presure to spray you can buy a chepa hopper. Don't get the little one ar harbor freight. I use that little hopper a lot for other things but it dows not have a large eough throat to spray cementitious material with aggregate. I have never sprayed .fiber reinforced material with a hopper gun but I think it is done. I have sprayed a lot of Thoroseal. Mix it, l;et it slake a while then mix it again and thin it down to spraying consistency and probably hve to thin it a little before you empty a bucketfull. You can apply it with a brush and work it in well that way. Might be a good idea to dampen the wall first. This is not an attractive texture but maybe that is what you have now.
If you have more thickness than only a brush coat think about learning how to spread it with a hawk and trowel and float it with a fed or black or green sponge float. This will help you blend the new onto the old too,
No bonding agnet between coats but if you use Acryl 60 in the first coat use it in the second and third. I have probably not used it in subsequent coats without a problem but it seems liek the literature says to do it with the acryl 60. That could come from the marketing department.
I have a three ring binder of Thoro literature. Seems like they are owned and rebranded by BASF now,

You asked about doing the patches then the whole wall. Not a bad idea. Decide after you do the patches. You might not think it is as fun as you think.
 
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Old 03-02-20, 02:09 PM
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Thanks tightcoat-
Parging is weathered, but visible swirls indicate applied by hand. Found up to 1/4-3/8" thick in some spots.
Therefore, do plan the trowel then sponge float process.
Found good YouTube videos by a guy named Kirk Giordano who appears to be a Master -at least good to watch somebody use the tools and discuss process.

"As fun as I think"? -ha! No Fun Expected!
Following the patches with a thin overcoat of entire wall seems best way to get good appearance, since not a painted foundation.

Thanks!
 
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