Pouring Footing with no large equipment access


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Old 10-08-20, 02:16 PM
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Question Pouring Footing with no large equipment access

I want to to pour footings for a 8" CMU crawl space foundation wall, but there is no access for large equipment to the area. From the closest access point to the far reaches of the project is about 170 feet. The project requires 5.5 cubic yards of concrete (code says 3000 psi w/ 5%-7% air entrainment).
Question #1 If I was able to use concrete mix bags (246 80# bags) or mix my own, How do I ensure the air entrainment?
Question #2 If I was to use concrete mix bags (246 80# bags) or mix my own, how many mixers and how big of a crew would I need to do it fast enough.
Question #3 If I was to mix my own concrete, How do I figure out how much Sand, Portland Cement, and course aggregate, I need to order.
Question #4 can concrete be pumped 170' economically. Also does the concrete supplier provide the pumping equipment or is that provided by another subcontractor?
Question #5 Are there any other alternatives?
 
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Old 10-08-20, 02:19 PM
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This is why they invented cranes and pump trucks. Economically? Not having to mix 250 bags by hand is a bargain at any price.
 
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Old 10-08-20, 02:57 PM
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Mixing/moving that much concrete by hand...... not happening.

I looked in your area and there are many concrete pumping companies listed.
Just search for "concrete pumping in my area".

From a site in your area.....
Concrete Pumping Cost
Concrete pumping for small residential jobs with a trailer-mounted pump and 200' hose costs $15 per cubic yard with a $125 minimum. For larger concrete pouring jobs that require a 75' to 105' boom truck ranges from $140 to $190 per hour with a typical 4- to 5-hour minimum.
 
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Old 10-08-20, 03:15 PM
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Just have it buggied to the back yard.

I have long, long ago given up doing cement work, there is no cheap, easy, non back breaking way to accomplish the task!

Going to start out building #2 next month, will be sitting on the deck watching my favorite cement guy do the work, Oh My, is my back is going to hurt writing that check!
 
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Old 10-09-20, 05:00 AM
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Like others have already suggested. I would budget for concrete pumping.
 
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Old 10-09-20, 07:19 AM
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Answer- A standard 15-19 cubic foot concrete buggy

should do that in 8 to 10 trips, which should be more than fast enough to avoid pouring problems.

5 cubic yards (cy)
1 cy is 3' x 3' x 3'x which equals 27 cubic feet (cf).
5 cy x 27 cf/cy =148 cf
148 cf feet in a 15 cf buggy is 10 trips, in a 19 cf buggy it's 8 trips.

Question 1- Will you need a tracked buggy or can do with a wheeled buggy.
Question 2- If you can't get equipment in, how are you excavating?
 
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Old 10-09-20, 09:15 AM
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You can also use the bucket of a front end loader or tractor. Be careful and do the math to calculate the weight of the concrete the bucket can hold. I've learned the hard way that the weight of a full bucket of concrete bouncing over rough terrain can blow the seals out of hydraulic cylinders or blow a hose.
 
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Old 10-09-20, 10:23 AM
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I've learned the hard way that the weight of a full bucket of concrete bouncing over rough terrain can blow the seals out of hydraulic cylinders or blow a hose.
Agreed- you can do it on a smooth stable surface, like a driveway. Not on an uneven route where you bounce. Hydraulic seals do NOT respond well to shocks, and a bounce can give a peak load 2x-10x the static load. I've seen it happen twice,

Once was while clearing a path in a municipal park: The job was to cut a path, chip up the brush and trees, then dump the wood chips to make a trail. Simple right? (What could possibly go wrong...) Chipper is dull, so its' throwing strips instead of chips, and they won't dump. Boss is driving backwards with the bed fully extended (against his own rules) Well, somebody cut a tree and left the stump too tall. Back tire hits the stump, jumps up and over it, but that bounce hyper-extends the ram, then slams the box back down . .
Me- "Why does it look like the truck is peeing itself?"

Other time was Center City Philly - somebody was driving a high-lift (extended of course) along the sidewalk, but drove over a 24" x 24" plastic-fiberglass access plate for stoplight controls. Plate breaks, tire drops into the sidewalk, high lift jerks hard and ALMOST throws the driver out of the bucket, then teeters out towards traffic, wobbles, and finally starts scissoring down.
 
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Old 10-09-20, 11:48 AM
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A Skid Steer / Bobcat can get back there, just not a truck, so a concrete buggy would work.
 
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Old 10-09-20, 01:57 PM
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Check the tool rental companies in your area to if concrete buggies are available. They don't exist in my area but are very common in larger cities. Worst case you can use a skid steer or in my rural area a bunch of guys with wheel barrows is the most common method.
 
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Old 10-09-20, 04:31 PM
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The concrete company should be able to supply A) a 15-19 CF concrete buggy or B) a bunch of guys with wheelbarrows. Worst case, you should still get 4 MDF fiberboard sheets (4 x 8) to avoid tearing up the ground at the ends of the concrete runs.
 
 

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