Leak where new basement foundation meets one


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Old 11-06-20, 11:30 AM
J
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Leak where new basement foundation meets one

I had an extension put in and we extended our basement as part of it. Where the new basement foundation wall meets the old existing basement wall we occasionally have water coming in where they meet as seen in the picture. Over the years weíve had someone come to try and fix the leak by injecting some material into the concrete wall from the inside up the wall where the water is coming in. It hasnít solved the issue. Thereís less water coming in now but still too much for me to bring finishing the basement. At this point Iím looking for suggestions on how to solve this problem so I donít have to worry about it anymore. Is this something that can be solved from the inside or does it require addressing it from the outside, by breaking up the concrete walkway and digging out to expose the foundation ?

 
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Old 11-06-20, 01:38 PM
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It really needs to be fixed from the outside. Like a boat you need to keep the water outside instead of dealing with it after it's gotten through the hull.

First are the usuals. Make sure all the ground around your house is sloped to direct all surface water well away from the home. You should have working gutters and downspouts and their discharge should lead well away from the house.

Does your basement have an exterior perimeter drain? Is it clear, not clogged? If there is no perimeter drain it really could use one to carry away water underground. This is really important because if water is allowed to accumulate around the basement walls or underneath it will eventually find a way in.

Then there is the water/damp proofing of the exterior of the basement walls. In some cases this might be as simple as a bitumen/tar like coating but might also include a reinforcing fabric similar to fiberglass. Sometimes a drainage barrier is also used. This can be an egg crate like plastic sheet that holds gravel/soil away from the foundation creating an open space for water to freely trickle down to be taken away by the perimeter drain.
 
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Old 11-06-20, 02:04 PM
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Most likely you had an epoxy injection repair which is usually an excellent repair, but your probably getting some small movement between the walls since the foundations are not the same and something is probably settling at a different rate.

Agree an exterior repair, probably a membrane, is in order. if you spend the money/time do it right!
 
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Old 02-08-21, 09:20 AM
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Took your advice and finally had someone help me attempt to fix this from the outside. Along the outside of the house these is concrete walkway so we had to break that up in order to dig out to the foundations footing. We did find an existing drainage pipe that stopped right where the old foundations footing met the new foundations footing. After taking the cap off we found it was clogged as well. I also put my hose in the gutter downspouts nearby where it attaches to the drain pipe which I thought was connected to it. After running the house for a minute or so the water started backing up in the downspout since either the drywell it connects to filled up or there is some other clog. Either way we didn't see any water coming out of the drainage by the foundations footin
We didn't notice any visible cracks in the area where the leak is coming through. So after re-tarring the area where the old foundation meets the new foundation we then adhered 6mil plastic on top of it. Instead of back filling it in we decided to leave it until the next heavy rain came to see if issue still exists.

Unfortunately, the issue isn't solved. We just recently had a snow storm, about 17", and after a couple of days when the snow started melting, I went into the basement and I saw water coming through on the inside walls in the same area - from about halfway up the wall and down was moist. Then went to look at the outside wall where we dug up but didn't see any water build up in that area we had covered with the tar and plastic.

Now I'm confused as how to proceed. Did we not seal the outside foundation properly? Or is the water somehow coming through somewhere else. While the outside foundation wall is still exposed I'd like to be able to fix this, if possible. Does anyone have any suggestions on what I could do next or possible explanations as to where water is still coming in from?
 
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Old 02-08-21, 11:28 AM
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I think the most important part of making a basement dry is to not let water get to it in the first place. It's almost impossible to waterproof old concrete meeting new. The key is to have a drainage system so water is never trying to force it's way inside. The tar is great for limiting moisture/humidity but a drainage membrane or crushed stone to intercept the water and lead it down to a drainage pipe is what does the hard work.
 
 

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