Spalling Front Door Concrete Threshold


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Old 02-24-21, 09:05 AM
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Spalling Front Door Concrete Threshold

The snow has finally melted and I found my front door concrete threshold is spalling. That explains why my door mat is always dirty. The chip in the front surface of the threshold has been there since we bought the house 8 years ago. The house is about 17 years old. What can I do to stop the spalling or fix it for good? I don't need a smooth surface there as it is just for the door to sit on. Should I just seal the surface? A quick look at HD, there are quite a few concrete repair products: Patching Compound, Vinyl Patch, Re-Cap Resurfacer, etc. What should I use? Thanks!


 
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Old 02-24-21, 09:38 AM
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You have some options. Here is a video promoting Quickcrete products. There are other brands and if you look around you can probably find some other videos. Most concrete patching products do not have much body so you can't probably fill the front in one coat. Most set fast however so you can do one coat, wait a while and do the next coat.
It is important to get alo the loose stuff off and get the salt residue cleaned off. You might be able to find a brand that is closer to the color you have than other brands
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Quikrete...0-35/202092184
 
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Old 02-24-21, 11:11 AM
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That is a bit more than spalling, it looks like the entire surface is deteriorating.

Concrete is not a repair friendly material and especially if it's outdoors in freeze thaw conditions..

There are epoxy repair materials that might work, any type of cement based product will flake off faster than the original material!
 
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Old 02-24-21, 11:58 AM
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I've tried numerous concrete patches and resurfacing products and none have held up long term. They do OK for a few years but getting wet and going through freeze thaw cycles is really hard on it.

I had a similar problem with the front entrance to my office building. I capped it with a piece of stainless steel almost 20 years ago and it still looks great. Yours would be a very simple piece with one bend in it and any steel fabrication or welding shop that has a break (machine that bends metal) would be able to easily make it. Then masonry anchors could attach it to your old threshold.
 
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Old 02-24-21, 12:43 PM
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I thought about suggesting replacement with a natural stone that is less susceptible to the action of salt. I like Pilot Dane's idea better. Is the metal bending machine a brake or a break?
 
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Old 02-24-21, 02:25 PM
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If it is cased by moisture, can I just seal it with a good penetrating sealer? What's about this one?

https://www.amazon.com/Armor-Approve...4204980&sr=8-7

I plan to buy this to seal the limestone trim on the sidings near the chimney.
 
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Old 02-24-21, 03:22 PM
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Probably the most important thing is to get down to solid material before you do your repair. Then use whatever material you like. The fix will not be permanent. You will have to do it again. In how much time you will have to do it is unknown. Renewing the sealer annually is an easy thing that might, maybe prolong the period between redoings. But this is an easy repair that should not take more than a half a day if the material is slow to set and a couple hours if it sets quickly.
 
 

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