Milled asphalt driveway option


  #1  
Old 03-06-21, 07:33 AM
T
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Milled asphalt driveway option

My daughter is getting proposals for a driveway, either gravel or tar and chip (also called "chipseal"), and someone suggested milled asphalt (not DIY) which seems to be between her other options, pricewise. I have no experience with this approach and would appreciate your views.

I've read it lasts a long time, requires less maintenance/upkeep, and a good option in colder environments. It also seems prone to potholes and may not be good to park on.

If anyone has experience with milled asphalt, I'd appreciate comments. How long does it last? Is it durable as a driveway option?
 
  #2  
Old 03-06-21, 07:48 AM
H
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Millings OVER an existing, well settled (5 years +) driveway are going to be fine.
Millings on unprepared soil? Depends on what sort of soil you have- sandy(ok), loam(ok) clay(nope)

We've got a paving company nearby, so many of our local parks have trails done with milled asphalt.
Generally, when you repave an asphalt road, you mill the surface to remove the old-oxidized "alligatored" surface which has brittle asphalt, to get down to the "good asphalt" which will give you adhesion for the new top or "wearing" coat.
Since they're coated with old brittle asphalt, millings generally don't meet DOT specifications for reuse, and so they costs the paving company money to truck away. This means they're a cheap source of aggregate/fill if you're close to a road that's being milled, and you can get them cheap / free because the paving co. wants to get rid of them as fast as they can.

Now, they DO pack down nicely, BUT you still want to have a base layer of stone for them.
You might just lay down millings onto soil and it works for a walking path, may work in well drained soils for a parking lot, but won't work if you've got wet or clay soils that turn to mud when they get wet.

For topping a driveway? Yes, millings, then a roller, then have it sealcoated - the asphalt sea will help bind the millings (and around me, some of the municipalities will take the millings and then re-use them to oil and chip the dirt roads.
 
  #3  
Old 03-06-21, 12:18 PM
T
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Hal, thanks for the post. She has sandy soil so that aspect should be fine.
 
 

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