Garden/Retaining Wall Questions


  #1  
Old 04-05-21, 02:03 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 263
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Garden/Retaining Wall Questions

Hello again everyone.

Just want to preface this with the fact that I am starting from scratch here.

There is a steep hill that ends in my back yard. it's about 3' high at the highest if you are standing at ground level. I am not allowed to dig it out. What I would like to do is build a 3' retention wall at the base of it and backfill it so that I have more flat surface to work with.

The wall I am planning to build is 18' long by 3' high.

I was looking at the bricks in the following link, but I'm not sure I understand. I thought that garden wall bricks had a "lip" in the back to prevent the wall from falling over. Looking at this brick, there doesn't seem to be any ledge or notch for the bricks to hold on to each other. What prevents the wall from just being knocked over?

http://www.expocrete.com/pdf/brochur...e-townsend.pdf

Technical specs only show how to build a bench, and uses the concrete adhesive. Should I assume that the same thing is to be applied for retention walls without a lip? Concrete adhesive and good do go?

I'll likely have more questions after that but first I just want to make sure that the bricks I am looking at are adequate.

Thanks in advance!
Shivaya


 
  #2  
Old 04-05-21, 02:12 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 7,293
Received 489 Votes on 453 Posts
For any kind of wall, especially a block wall, you need a good foundation and need to address any water issues.

Small walls under 18" are simple but when your getting over that then the prep work gets more involved because without the foundation and water eventually the wall will get pushed outward due to pressure from the earth behind.

The higher the wall the bigger the blocks physically need to be. I'd say these appear a bit on the small side for a 3' wall!

Ive got some areas with 3-4' walls but they are using 18-24" dia boulders, they aren't going anywhere!
 
Shivaya voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 04-05-21, 04:03 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 263
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hmm, thanks alot Marq1 - helpful as usual.

Really something to think about. There is definitely a potential water issue given that I am in canada and at the bottom of a large hill. All the water melts and comes down my way in the spring. When you talk about water issues, do you mean ensuring adequate drainage and sealing the back of the wall, or is is something more intricate than that?

Looks like I may want to keep my wall shorter, or I have lots of homework to do...
 
  #4  
Old 04-06-21, 05:10 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 25,081
Received 867 Votes on 798 Posts
If you are building a wall with dry stack concrete blocks you do not water seal the wall. You do have to install a drainage system on the uphill side of the wall to remove any water from the back side.
 
Shivaya voted this post useful.
  #5  
Old 04-06-21, 09:56 AM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5,761
Received 189 Votes on 169 Posts
I agree that these blocks seem too small for the wall you're planning on building. Nice for a decorative wall like is in the picture, but I think you need something more structurally sound for a 3' high wall.

Most/all block manufacturers will have spec sheets on how to build a wall that height using their materials and will include drainage requirements as Pilot Dane mentioned.

Here's an example manual for wall design using Unilock. Not necessarily recommending their products specifically, but you'll get a general idea of what's needed.
https://unilock.com/construction/wall-construction-101/
 
  #6  
Old 04-07-21, 11:14 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 263
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As always, this forum comes through with all the important stuff I need to know.
Much appreciated my friends. Zorfdt, that link really explains everything I need to know. I'll do my due diligence starting from there and try to get better bricks.
Cheers to all, and thanks again!


 
  #7  
Old 04-07-21, 03:26 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 25,081
Received 867 Votes on 798 Posts
I use Keystone blocks for my walls but there are other brands. Installation instructions are available on the website and will tell you more than you wanted to know. And, the most important part is to actually follow the installation instructions. One of the most important parts that many DIYer's skimp on is the base/foundation and it's the most important step for a wall that will last a long time.
 
Shivaya voted this post useful.
  #8  
Old 04-07-21, 05:33 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 263
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Roger that Dane, I'll make sure that the footing get the attention it needs.
Cheers,
Nic
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: