Stucco Damage Repair Below Soil Line


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Old 09-06-21, 02:29 PM
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Stucco Damage Repair Below Soil Line

Greetings All. While cleaning out the raised flower bed located in front of the fireplace I found this deterioration of the stucco covering the brick fireplace. The attached photo shows a concrete pad under the chimney, and the chimney brick covered by stucco. So far I have cleaned out a lot of soil and plant roots from the void that should be stucco. Some of the other ares of stucco appear to no longer be adhering well to the fireplace bricks. Appears to me I should chisel off all of the loose and deteriorated stucco, wash out remnants of any dirt/soil/roots, and then re-cover the exposed area. At this point I am assuming the mortar between the lowest courses of bricks is intact and not compromised. I have several questions :
1. Should an adhesive primer be applied to the exposed areas before I apply the new stucco? And, if so what is an appropriate product to use ?
2. Because this area is below the soil/moisture/water line of the flower bed, is it better to use a Stucco, a Mortar, or a Cement product to fill the exposed area - in order to establish a better barrier or seal to the elements of nature ?
Any and All feedback welcome, Thank you in advance.
David

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Old 09-07-21, 11:15 AM
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Should an adhesive primer be applied to the exposed areas before I apply the new stucco? And, if so what is an appropriate product to use ?
Never hurts. Clean off all the loose stuff you can, wire brush the bricks or whatever is exposed. Mix up a mile acid solotion Use Muriatic acid quite dilute Depending on the strength of the acid maybe 10 water :1acid by volume. If it fizzes a little that is good; if it smokes rinse immediately and dilute the acid more. Rinse and rinse again with clean water. Now you have a mud hole. Let it dry then apply a bonding agend Weld Cete wy Larsens Products is the cadilac of the industry but you might have to buy an expensive gallon to get it. QuickCrete makes one and they sell it in quarts. Get bonding adhesive not concrete fortifier.

2. Because this area is below the soil/moisture/water line of the flower bed, is it better to use a Stucco, a Mortar, or a Cement product to fill the exposed area - in order to establish a better barrier or seal to the elements of nature ?

No more area than you are looking at here buy some premixed mortar or stucco base coat. You wtill mix this with water. don't buy some ready mixed in a bucket sticky goop.
Mix the material and press it into the void and fill out to flush. If the void is too deep and it starts to slump out then you might have to give it two coats. Leave the first coat rough enough to get a bond on the second coat. Fill it out to flush then rub it with a wet red foam float to blend the edges. After this has set and cured a couple days mix some of the same material and flick some off of a whisk broom to get some background texture then add the texture to match the existing. It looks like this has been painted so paint to match. In markets where stucco is prevalent you can buy the finish material in several colors, one or two of which might come close to matching. You can use this for the finish. You will have to buy a whole bag of which you will use a half gallon. That is why I suggest paint.

There are dozens of posts here about doing this kind of work. Just nose around until you find some.
There are also some Youtube videos that might be helpful. That red haired guy with a lot of videos has pretty good advice. His first name is Kirk. I forget the last name. Just look around on youtube for stucco and you will probably find him.
 
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Old 09-09-21, 11:59 AM
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Tightcoat, I appreciate the response and specific recommendations. Reading up on muriatic acid, there seems to be more cons than pros. I'll continue to investigate this and any other suitable cleaners.
My neighbor has some left over Quikrete Concrete Bonding Adhesive to consider plus l'll look for another bonding agent at my local big-box store.
For a premixed mortar or stucco base coat, hopefully I can find this in a smaller quantity than 60-100 lbs bags (LOL).
In reference to the "ready mixed in a bucket sticky goop", I perceive that is something like the LaBabra Stucco Sandable Basecoat. I must say their online instructions are not clear if the user is adding water to an acrylic powder or to an acrylic paste in the tub/container. More homework is needed.
Great tips on layering the coats and developing a texture on the top coat.
Yes, the finished repair will be primed and painted to match the wall.
I'll fumble around for additional post on doing this type of work as well as look for some YouTube references to Kirk.

Many Thanks and any additional feedback is always welcome.
David
 
 

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