Chimney separation from house


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Old 11-21-21, 01:00 PM
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Talking Chimney separation from house

My chimney has about an inch separation from the house. It starts a little more than half way up the chimney. I had caulked this crack about 7 to 10 years ago. It appears to have gotten worse. Living in the northeast I think its due to the storms we've had, especially the recent IDA hurricane. I had a pro clean my chimney and he pointed it out and said he would need to rebuild the top section. He said the chimney is probably not bracketed to the house. This will cost a pretty penny and Im not doing that anytime soon. Right now I want to seal this crack from the rain and coming snow. I plan on using backer rod and some foam sealant and then caulking wherever else I need to.

What do you think about my plan? Does anyone know about these foam sealants? I found several on amazon that seem like they will do the job. I would think at the very least they should be water resistant. I need to get this cracked sealed from moisture for at least a temporary fix and I want to get this done before winter sets in which will be in about 3 weeks. Will the foam sealant dry in 40-50 degree temps? Its been going into 30s at night. How about the caulk?

I have attached photos for some perspective. All intelligent comments are appreciated!








Thanks
Rob







 
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Old 11-21-21, 02:01 PM
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I think the first thing I would do is get a couple estimates from foundation repair companies. It's possible that a little mud jacking under the foundation could ease the chimney back into place. Because it's settling, causing it to lean away from the house like the leaning tower of Pisa.
 
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Old 11-21-21, 02:10 PM
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I'm a little curious why you choose a grinning face for your thread.
That's a pretty serious problem there.

Seal the gap.
Sealant won't keep your chimney from toppling over.
 
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Old 11-24-21, 07:00 AM
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For some odd reason this site didnt post my entire comment so Im posting again.


Sleeper - Im thinking the cost of foundation repair would be in the thousands similar to rebuilding the top part of the chimney?

Pete - Its pretty obvious from what I posted that I will be sealing the gap. And your comment "Sealant won't keep your chimney from toppling over"? LOL...you've got to be kidding!

I asked if anyone knows anything about these sealants? i.e. best temperatures to apply the sealant, is below 50 degrees to cold to apply? It looks like it will be in the low 40s when I apply this. Do you know the answers to this?

Also tell me something, how many homeowners do you know that had a chimney topple over?

Rob
 
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Old 11-24-21, 07:07 AM
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Rebuilding the chimney will cost several times more. I would not use a foam sealant, no. Anything you do to seal it would need to be removed if you ever had hopes of mudjacking it back into place.
 
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Old 11-24-21, 04:35 PM
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Either the foundation under the chimney is sinking, or the house is tilting away from the chimney.
You can determine which is happening.

If the base of the chimney is sinking, then building a new chimney on it doesn't seem like a good idea.

So first step would be reinforcing that base, and "mudjacking" might do that and "upright" the chimney at the same time. Way cheaper than building a new chimney.

As far as how many chimneys topple over - almost all do, given enough time and lack of maintenance. Yours has a head start.
 

Last edited by I Mullins; 11-24-21 at 04:51 PM.
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Old 11-24-21, 06:22 PM
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Sleeper - So what is the "mudjacking process"? It sounds like digging up under the chimney and lifting it up? And once its jacked back into place then what? How does it stay in place without detaching again? I have a concrete walk way along side the house which sounds like would be destroyed once a jack has to go under it and lift up the chimney.
 
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Old 11-24-21, 06:35 PM
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They drill holes in the foundation and inject mud or cement under very high pressure.
They can do the same thing to sidewalks with only dime sized holes.
You can hardly tell it has been done. Very effective.
 
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Old 12-03-21, 10:11 AM
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Thank you PJ

I spoke to a pro about mudjacking and he said helical piles are the better alternative although a little more expensive. He said mudjacking is not as reliable since after 4 or 5 years it could shift again due to the soil.

I may do one of these but not sure. In the meantime I will caulk the gap since it will be a lot easier to remove than the foam sealant if I get this done.

My question is - as far as caulking the gap, the gap is about an inch in some parts so when caulking with the tube it will not cover the gap with just a first pass on the gap. I will have to spread the caulk out with the gun which will get messy as Im no expert. Is there any other way to caulk like using a spreader (I forget the name of the tool - its like a spatula that comes in different sizes) for spackle to spread the caulk over the gap? Do they sell caulk in cans like spackle? Then I can just take the spreader and glop it on over the gap and even it out. Seem like it would be easier then using a caulk gun. I will be using backer rod to fill the gap.

Rob
 
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Old 12-03-21, 10:27 AM
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You can use a putty knife or sheetrock knives for working large areas of caulk.

Since you need so much I would use the larger 28-30 oz size caulking tubes & gun instead of the more common 10 oz size.
 
 

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