Stone walkway with Mortar or Concrete in Arkansas.


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Old 01-25-22, 07:00 AM
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Stone walkway with Mortar or Concrete in Arkansas.

Previous Owner laid out stone and gravel along the front of the home. I would like to set those in concrete or mortar, wondering if I need to do a concrete base first then mortar and stone on top. Our climate is not too harsh but we do get 15-20 days of hard freeze but was thinking I could just use mortar for the whole thing, sitting the big flagstones in as I go.

Thoughts?
 
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Old 01-26-22, 04:46 PM
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My opinion is that if you get freeze and thaw cycles, you need to add portland. Mortar alone will not hold very long.
 
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Old 01-26-22, 05:06 PM
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laid out stone and gravel along the front of the home.
Like a bed of decorative gravel/stone?

Why the desire to add mortar? Without a proper foundation it's going to break up, seems like it's just going to end up a big mess of stone and busted up mortar!
 
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Old 01-27-22, 04:48 AM
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If you want to mortar your stones I would first pour a proper 4" thick concrete slab underneath. Then you can mortar down the stones on top. Without a solid foundation underneath most stones simply mortared will crack and start coming apart under the slight movement of use and freeze/thaw cycles. That is why paver patios use sand in the joints as it allows minor movement without cracking & failing.
 
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Old 01-27-22, 02:07 PM
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If you want to mortar your stones I would first pour a proper 4" thick concrete slab underneath.
That's correct. What do you put underneath the 4" slab? Nothing? I recommend at least 3 inches of pea gravel.
 
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Old 01-27-22, 03:34 PM
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In residential construction it is very common to pour concrete patios, walkways and driveways right onto the soil. Of course over digging and installing a compacted crushed stone base is better, but it is not often done because of the added cost. Pea gravel isn't good because it's essentially marbles. It's free draining but doesn't lock together to provide good support to the slab above. If you walk on or set a chair on an area someone has landscaped with pea gravel you'll understand why it's not used in construction much.
 
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Old 01-27-22, 11:19 PM
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I recommend at least 3 inches of pea gravel.
Pea gravel is good for covering drainage pipes and fields, not for foundation support,
 
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Old 01-29-22, 11:39 AM
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I'm not a pro in this field but I don't consider pea gravel a proper sub-base under concrete proper either.
Crushed rock or gravel well compacted would be proper. Pea gravel cannot be compacted.
Feel free to reply again but don't be rude.
 
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Old 01-29-22, 11:57 AM
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Pea gravel cannot be compacted.
Of course it can. I've seen people do it.

The reason i asked which part of the country they are from is because maybe they use something that works for them. It's not being rude.
 
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Old 01-29-22, 04:59 PM
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Nope, pea gravel does not compact. Someone may have had a compactible material and called it such but that doesn't make it so.
 
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Old 01-29-22, 05:14 PM
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Of course it can. I've seen people do it.
Seeing other people do it doesn't make it right... That's like saying something must be true because you read it on the internet.

People often throw around the term "gravel" to refer to various kinds of small rocks... crushed or otherwise. However, "pea gravel" is typically defined as rounded, washed, and is in its natural state. It has not been crushed. It ranges from roughly 3/16" to 1/2" in size. It can be used to backfill certain things and it is often thought of as self compacting, but that is because it readily flows when placed. As Pilot Dane already mentioned, it also flows when stepped on. A plate compactor tends to dig a trench when used on a thick layer of pea gravel, and the person walking behind the compactor leaves his footprints in the pea gravel because it simply shifts out of the way when stepped on. Therefore it is NOT highly compacted (as a base material should be) because if it was it would not shift.

Since concrete workers often have to walk inside the forms as the pour concrete, having a base that shifts under foot traffic is not desirable. Crushed rock combined with fines makes the best base material.

You are free to have your opinion but the consensus of the professionals who moderate this forum is that pea gravel is not suitable under pavers or under concrete since it is prone to shifting. The industry standard is to use crushed rock as a base material.

Pea gravel is often spread on rural gravel roads, used in decorative landscaping with a rigid border to hold it in, and it is often used as an aggregate in concrete. It is not recommended as a base material.

Incorrect advice on this site will typically be corrected, moderated and/or deleted.
 
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Old 01-29-22, 06:07 PM
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https://www.homedepot.com/p/SAKRETE-...0302/100350267

This is pea gravel. It is not round. It has sharp edges. The OP can choose to disregard my advice.
 
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Old 01-29-22, 06:13 PM
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The package you linked to doesn't have the word "pea" on it anywhere. In other words, that is NOT pea gravel. It is "all purpose gravel".

THIS is Sakrete pea gravel.

 
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Old 01-29-22, 06:42 PM
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Sakrete can call it "NO-PURPOSE GRAVEL" if they want. But it's pea gravel. That's pea gravel. Go to homedepot, open up a bag and feel the gravel. It's pea gravel.
 
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Old 01-29-22, 06:47 PM
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You are the only one who thinks it's pea gravel. Pea gravel is rounded. As you said, the gravel in that bag is not round. Therefore it is not pea gravel, because pea gravel is rounded... thus the name. Sakrete pea gravel and Sakrete All purpose gravel are 2 different products, different shapes, different sizes. Calling it by the wrong name does not make you correct, just stubborn.

Home Depot pea gravel: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Vigoro-0...4255/202523000
 
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Old 01-29-22, 08:05 PM
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Agree with X - pea gravel is rounded and gets its name for it's resemblance to the vegetable.
 
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Old 01-29-22, 09:20 PM
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...gets its name for it's resemblance to the vegetable.
Where you get that idea? Did you just make that up?
 
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Old 01-29-22, 09:22 PM
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@XSleeper, this is not a rude comment so don't take it as such. Do you work with masonry at all? I am telling you Sakrete "all purpose gravel" is pea gravel. I am an old timer. I know pea gravel when i see and feel it.
 
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Old 01-29-22, 09:30 PM
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Doesn't change the fact that pea gravel is not a good base for pavers, while crushed rock is. Yes, I have been in construction full time for the past 30 yrs so you don't need to question my credentials, or any of the other moderators who are also professionals. This is not open for debate and I'm closing this thread as it is going nowhere.
 
 

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