retaining wall

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  #1  
Old 01-11-02, 01:14 PM
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retaining wall

I have a very sloped driveway and just beside it is a cut-out. I need to build a retaining wall there ranging from 1' to 6' high. What is the best way to do this without having to worry about the wall collapsing. I have considered block and timber but don't know what is best. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Scott
 
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  #2  
Old 01-11-02, 03:07 PM
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If you're an experience block man a retaining wall 6' high should not pose a problem, as long as the footing and rebar are sufficient. Since you ask the question I assume you want to do it yourself but be careful. A poorly constructed retaining wall can end up costing you alot. You can get a generic engineered retaining wall plan from you local building dept. That will give you footing dimensions and such.

How about trying the dry stacked retaining wall blocks. They should be available in your local building supply yard or home center. This way you don't need to worry about being a professional mason to build the wall, just get the footing right and start stacking. If you're worried about the first course, try hiring a mason just to do that much, then stack the rest yourself.
 
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Old 01-12-02, 09:31 AM
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dry stack wall on footers

Thanks for the info nucman. The company that built my modular filed bankruptcy and left me with the task of completing the retaining wall. They already poured footers with rebar. Is it possible to use dry stack material with the footers? The footers slope about 17" over a 40' span.

thanks ahead for any info

dd
 
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Old 01-13-02, 05:28 PM
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I don't see why not, especially if the footing is flat and smooth. It actually makes the job easier since a flat smooth footing is ideal for a base. One of the beauties of the dry stack wall is it still looks good even if it is not laid level but follows the slope of the driveway. If the rebar is in the way you can cut it off, or incorporate it into the dry stacked wall.

At least you got the footing before the builder went under, could have been worse.

Have fun, Nuc
 
  #5  
Old 01-19-02, 07:15 AM
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For any type of retaining wall (preferably masonry, either block or segmental retaining wall) make sure you have provided sufficient drainage. At the base, install atleast a 4" perforated PVC draintile, a filter fabric, and washed gravel... and the washed gravel needs to be used every course to the top... to provide hydraulic pressure relief and drainage from any water pressure behind the wall. That pressure is the reason most walls fail... regardless of what material is used ... block, SRW, or even railroad ties! SRW's typically use a set-back which also helps to work against the forces of the soil behind the wall. If you're going over 4', please use some geotextile fabric to help reinforce your hill starting on about the second course and alternating courses to the top. Consult with your nearest SRW distributor or consult an soil engineer if you have unstable soil conditions. With the diverse products available on the market today, there shouldn't be any wall failures if you make sure that your footing, base, and wall materials are installed correctly.
 
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Old 10-26-08, 07:46 PM
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Huge planter box...what am I missing???

[IMG]http://outdoors.webshots.com/photo/2538047220030571139JKuFoW[/IMG

As you see from the pic, I am building a very large planter box. The front will be 3 blocks high <level> and the back will be 4 blocks high <4 levels> with half a cinder block on each end to off set this. The drains in the middle are for run off water from the patio. I am drilling holes in the back for the planters to drain. This will have a rock base 1 level high to my 3 levels and will have the planting screen on top to strain water from the dirt so I do not lose my dirt from the box. I am stuccoing the inside and useing cultured stone for the facing on the front and the 1 level in the back faceing the front. The back will also be stuccoed. I plan on pouring 1.5 blocks <levels> high of concrete. Do I need to use rebar between my 2nd and 3rd levels or just the mortor??? Little lost here....here is another pick of the end for what I am planning....



http://outdoors.webshots.com/photo/2...30571139JKuFoW <Pic one>

http://outdoors.webshots.com/photo/2...30571139bSgsmQ <pic two>
 
  #7  
Old 10-26-08, 07:53 PM
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Huge planter box...what am I missing???

[IMG]http://outdoors.webshots.com/photo/2538047220030571139JKuFoW[/IMG

As you see from the pic, I am building a very large planter box. The front will be 3 blocks high <level> and the back will be 4 blocks high <4 levels> with half a cinder block on each end to off set this. The drains in the middle are for run off water from the patio. I am drilling holes in the back for the planters to drain. This will have a rock base 1 level high to my 3 levels and will have the planting screen on top to strain water from the dirt so I do not lose my dirt from the box. I am stuccoing the inside and useing cultured stone for the facing on the front and the 1 level in the back faceing the front. The back will also be stuccoed. I plan on pouring 1.5 blocks <levels> high of concrete. Do I need to use rebar between my 2nd and 3rd levels or just the mortor??? Little lost here....here is another pick of the end for what I am planning....



http://outdoors.webshots.com/photo/2...30571139JKuFoW <Pic one>

http://outdoors.webshots.com/photo/2...30571139bSgsmQ <pic two>
 
  #8  
Old 10-26-08, 08:17 PM
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with the size you are building i would have done a trough block with rebar and concrete to brace the bottom. however if you will install about 6 in of drainage gravel with a silt fabric over it to allow good drainage you probably will not have to much force pushing out on your blocks. water retention inside of the planter will cause you the most problems.

good luck

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