chimney demoition

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Old 05-26-02, 11:40 PM
Redsled
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chimney demoition

This is not so much a brick contruction question, but a deconstruction question. My roof has devloped a leak at the flashing around an old chimney. The chimney is no longer in use and is about 18" x 18" and about 14 feet high built against the exterior surface of the wall and only cuts into the lower edge of the roof, ending at the inner soffit edge.
My question is this: Being totally ignorant to brick and masonry techniques, is a chimney usually tied into a roof or is it freestanding and what is the best method for tearing it down- hammer/chisel, Hilte with jackhammer bit......
Thanks for any info
 
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  #2  
Old 05-27-02, 05:35 AM
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Chimney demolition

Building codes usually determine how chimneys are constructed. Some are freestanding, while others are required to be tied into the structure, as in earthquake prone areas. Chimneys tied to the structure usually are strapped with visible metal straps that have been nailed or bolted to framing. http://www.eqe.com/publications/homeprep/maschimn.htm

Repairs to chimneys, roof, and flashing are usually an easier and less expensive alternative than demolition. Demolition will require a sledge, cold chisel, goggles, and a lot of energy and patience. It is recommended that you check with local authorities regarding the requirement of any permits before beginning the demolition.

"Most chimney flashing consists of a two-part system - the "L-shaped" flashing that abuts the roof and the chimney and the counter flashing or "cap shield" that covers the piece facing the chimney. Ideally, the counter flashing should contain a small 90-degree bend at the top that is embedded into the mortar joint between layers of brick. Often, however, the joint is simply smeared with an asphalt roofing compound or caulked - both methods of which are temporary, at best. The longest-lasting fix is to remove the existing counter flashing and replace it with new material that is embedded into the mortar joint. There is yet another reason why the chimney is a primary source of flashing leaks - its independence. While this isn't true with modern zero clearance models, traditional brick fireplaces and chimneys are so heavy that they require their own foundation.
Consequently, the fireplace and chimney can move at a different rate than the roof and the rest of the home. The location becomes a push-me-pull-you, and results in a tear." Carey, J. & M. Flashing can make or break a roof. Stoneway Roofing Supply. Retrieved 27 May 2002. http://www.stonewayroofing.com/story....view?rowID=11
 
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Old 05-27-02, 06:14 AM
Redsled
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Thanks for the info. Since I posted this message, I ran into the old homowner and told him the ordeal I was about to take on and he got a strange look on his face. He said he noticed the leak two years before selling and put a whole new layer of shingles on that half of the roof. I examined the flashing which was glopped with tar and pulled away from the brick instead of having a cap cut in. A $1500 attempt that didn't work vs ten dollars to do it right...its people like this that give me hope when I'm hesitant about screwing up.
 
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Old 05-27-02, 07:05 AM
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doityourself.com

Glad to be of service. This is a great site for checking before beginning a project.
 
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