sidewalk problems

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Old 06-03-02, 01:50 PM
josh1
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sidewalk problems

Hi

I will soon embark on fixing a sidewalk 4' wide by rougly 75 feet long with curves etc... This was installed less than a year ago by a professional contractor and every time it rains the water washes down it ( its compacted sand or dust) and creates large "valleys" I would like to isolate this problem as he clearly did not do it properly. The sidewalk is about 25 feet of flat followed by 50' grade downhill not sure the slope but was "supposed" to be wheelchair complaint when he did it so 1' @ 12" slope 1/12 ..the water seems to collect on the surface of the dust and run downhill wearing it away into the parking lot. I was thinking of fitting some sort of drainage perforated pipe? and or just using a larger 2b or so pebble stone to go overtop the whole surface and renting a plate compactor? Any advice of information is appreciated thanks ---Josh
 
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Old 06-05-02, 04:53 AM
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Sidewalk problems

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/prin...220000,00.html

Perhaps coarse washed concrete sand would be more durable?
"Tamping the Pavers
Now run the compactor over the pavers. This starts the process of locking everything in place. The compactor is pressing the pavers down, evening out the tops of the pavers, and forcing some of the sand up into joints from underneath.

Next you fill the joints with sand from above. And this is what makes a patio incredibly strong.


You should be able to use the same type of coarse washed concrete sand as you did for the bedding layer. However, you need the sand to be pretty dry.


The process is to spread sand with a broom, run the compactor over the pavers, spread some more sand, compact, and so on, until the joints are filled. This process will make for a very solid paver surface.


After your paver project is complete you have the option to seal the pavers. Sealing will bring out the colors of the pavers and protect them from stain, but you will have to reseal them every few years." Decks, Porches and Patios: Paver Patios & Walkways.
Retrieved 05 June 2002. http://www.hometime.com/projects/how...j/pc2lgpav.htm

Redirecting the source of the excess runoff might also be helpful.
 
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