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2001 Honda Civic LX sell or keep?


Saddlebum's Avatar
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12-04-12, 03:32 PM   #1  
2001 Honda Civic LX sell or keep?

My sister has a 2001 Honda Civic LX 4 door manual with 105k miles. She's wondering if she should upgrade to a newer year vehicle before this one starts costing her money. She drives about 25 miles to work everyday at a hospital and needs dependable transportation.

Also, I am suggesting if she does sell it, to get a Subaru of some kind. She lives alone and needs something really dependable.

Thanks!

 
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12-04-12, 03:54 PM   #2  
For starters I'm not a big Subaru fan, but that's personal opinion. My spousal unit's '01 Camry has 152,000 on it and I'm in no hurry to trade it off.

My standard warning to Honda owners with older cars; if you haven't changed the timing belt, do it now before it fails and hands you a $1500 repair bill. Otherwise, if it's in good condition 105K miles is nothing. A 2001 with that kind of miles has averaged under 10k per year. If you do trade it off, don't let it go cheap; unless it's beat it should fetch a premium price.


Measure it with a micrometer; cut it with an ax.

 
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12-04-12, 03:55 PM   #3  
How much has she spent already on repairs? IMO thats a pretty new vehicle if properly maintained. Could easily go 200K with just basic maintenance.

There's some sort of rule of thumb that if repairs cost more than 3 months payments on a new car..time to start looking. Not sure if that's it exactly...but close.

I have a 2000 Mazda Tribute with 150k that unfortunately has had 3 trans rebuilds...but it was paid off in 5 yrs....so I have spent about 4K in 10 yrs as opposed to a $350 a month car payment (about $42K!!!)..as well as higher insurance.

Other than those tranny problems, it's been trouble free.


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12-04-12, 03:57 PM   #4  
In my opinion, I'd keep the Civic. Civic's are known to easily go 200K miles with next to no issues. Sounds like she's putting on some good mileage and if she were to go with a newer car it would depreciate that much quicker with that amount of driving. Keep on top of the maintenance and that Civic will go for a long time yet.

 
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12-04-12, 04:08 PM   #5  
Opps, just found out it actually has 165k and she hasn't had any major problems with it. Just normal maintenance.

Thanks!

 
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12-05-12, 04:40 AM   #6  
I still don't think the mileage is too high. As tow guy mentioned, TIMING BELT change is imperative. It will be the "heart and lungs" of the car for the remainder of it's life. A good maintenance schedule, tires, filters, oil changes, good gas (stay away from E15 if it is available), and it will likely be a good car.
According to NADA the car is probably worth $3300 in trade and $5200 personal sale, so can she come out ahead with that considering the price of new cars???

I had driven one of my helpers to a dealership to pick up a used car he purchased. It was a Lincoln dealership. Mind you I haven't bought a new car in 25 years. While he did paperwork I walked around the lot. The Navigator didn't have a price tag in it....obviously......if you have to ask, you can't afford it $61,000!! I didn't breathe for a full minute, I think.

 
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12-05-12, 04:44 AM   #7  
That's a bit different. My timing belt advice still applies (I would assume it was done once already, but even if it was done @ 100k miles it's not too early to be safer than sorrier). At 165k that's just about average mileage for that age car. I would be inclined to keep it a couple of more years. As to the replacement, ZeeBass makes a very good point about mileage/depreciation; that would tend to make a late model/low mileage used car preferable to a "new" car, but I notice you used the phrase "newer year" so maybe that's your mindset already.


Measure it with a micrometer; cut it with an ax.

 
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12-05-12, 03:46 PM   #8  
yes it is, late model/low mileage used car. Want to thank everyone for their great advise. I personally think it wise to hang onto it for a couple more years. Thanks!

 
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12-06-12, 04:46 AM   #9  
How's the underside (especially brake lines, suspension, and steering) holding up against the road salt? A lot of cars I see that old with some northern history are rustbuckets. Towed two cars last month with blown out brake lines from road salt corrosion.


Measure it with a micrometer; cut it with an ax.

 
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12-06-12, 08:23 PM   #10  
My wife's '01 Integra, which is mechanically similar to the Civic, is at about 130k and we expect to get closer to 200k before replacing it unless our needs change. What she should do is start putting away money at about 2/3 the monthly cost of what a new car payment would be (so probably $200-$300 per month) so that if she does have to fix it or have to buy a new car, she's already got the money set aside and is used to "spending" it like that.

 
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12-07-12, 09:10 AM   #11  
As long as it's still trustworthy, I would hang on to it. That said, I would also start funding a new car account somewhere so she's ready if it goes belly up.

 
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12-07-12, 08:33 PM   #12  
She had a windfall in the form of a insurance payment. That's the problem. Now, she has money to go out and burn on a vehicle. I'm glad she's willing to research the worthiness of her current car a bit. She IS great with money tho. Way better than me.

 
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12-10-12, 08:39 PM   #13  
Advise her that technology is fairly rapidly changing with vehicles, and that if she can wait, she should wait. The new Dart gets 40mpg in the right configuration, and that's a completely conventional drivetrain, no hybrid, no CVT, no "manumatic". Automakers are going to have to meet even more stringent guidelines in the coming years, and 50+ is not impossible by the time that Civic is actually worn out. I would wait for now.

 
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12-11-12, 02:43 PM   #14  
Thanks! I did advise her to do that. She finally looked underneath and said it's looks good to her. I will forward that latest posts so she reads them.

Thanks so much - so very helpful.

 
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