Choosing Snowshoe Shape?

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-06-12, 03:04 PM
Group Moderator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 16,893
Choosing Snowshoe Shape?

Does anyone have advice for choosing the shape of snowshoe? Size is easy but I'm down to choosing between one pair with a rounded heel and the other has a pointed tail. They will be used on light to moderate hills in forested terrain. I have only tried the different styles years apart so I can't compare them well in my mind but I'm tending toward the rounded heel style thinking it would be better to maneuver in trees & brush and would not hang up so bad when backing up.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-06-12, 03:06 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 18,497
Not a lot of experience with them but I certainly can't fault the logic you used to lean toward the rounded back.
 
  #3  
Old 09-06-12, 05:54 PM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 9,628
I like the oval style overall but the wide stride gets pretty tiring in open country.
 
  #4  
Old 09-07-12, 05:18 AM
Group Moderator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 16,893
I'm mainly looking at 8x25 which I assumed they would be the same width regardless of the tail shape. And, since I'm in a part of NC where snowshoes are useless I'm ordering online so I can't compare very well.
 
  #5  
Old 09-07-12, 05:53 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,541
Guess this would be my area to speak up...

The "beaver tail" or "tear drop" snowshoes where originally shaped that way because of how the wood was bent. The pointed back really doesn't have any benefit.

The more modern oval shape ones tend to be smaller and lighter.

Myself, I still use the old beaver tail snowshoes. They are better in deep snow (bigger surface area), make a great shovel in a pinch, and mine are very old (given to me by my grandfather). For back country, not on a packed walking trail, these (in my opinion) work better then the modern ones. That being said, with the wider foot print, it takes a bit of getting use to if trecking along a slope.
The modern oval shoes are lighter, and smaller (as noted above). This makes long distance walking easier, and they attach easier to a pack when not needed. The bindings also tend to fit better on modern winter boots where my old beaver tail shoes require smaller boots (I wear hiking boots).
They do however tend to be too small of a foot print when you go off the beaten path. If you are going to get oval shoes, buy bigger then specified for your body weight.

Long story short, if you are looking to walk snow shoe paths, the oval ones will work. If you are looking to go into the back country and play in the deep stuff, stick with the beaver tail shoes.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'