Coleman camping stove fuel advice?

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Old 08-11-16, 04:31 PM
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Coleman camping stove fuel advice?

I have an old school gas coleman stove I use on rare occasions. Well we are taking off this weekend and I am wondering if I would have any issues using high octane or airline fuel, as opposed to the specific coleman fuel?
The coleman fuel can does not state any spec information.
thanks
 
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Old 08-11-16, 05:14 PM
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Coleman make dual fuel models now that can use coleman fuel or unleaded gasoline. Some folks report using unleaded gas in older, non dual fuel stoves without problem; but I suspect you don't hear about the ones who did have a problem

Myself...I'd stick with coleman fuel unless I had a dual fuel stove.
 
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Old 08-11-16, 05:38 PM
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I would agree with Carbide, it is best to use the proper fuel. I believe you can now buy smaller quantities of Coleman fuel than the gallon can you had to buy from the past. I would also hate to have your weekend messed up using the wrong fuel.
 
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Old 08-12-16, 05:32 AM
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I always use naptha/Coleman fuel. It lights easy and burns clean and all stoves can use it.

Yes, most stoves work OK on kerosene, diesel, jet fuel and auto gasoline. Kerosene, Jet A, diesel is harder to light and makes more soot/smoke. Then there is the wonderful diesel taste in your food. I consider auto gas an emergency option only. It's very volatile so there is the danger issue. Then there are all the additives needed for an auto engine that probably aren't so great in your food. If going with auto gas I would not spend the money on high test. The difference is important to an internal combustion engine but does nothing for how a stove burns.

NEVER use AVGAS/100LL (100 low lead). As it's name says it contains lead which should never be anywhere near your food.
 
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Old 08-15-16, 11:11 PM
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coleman_fuel

happens to be low octane
worked fine with standard gas
 
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Old 08-16-16, 12:23 AM
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Though Coleman fuel has an octane rating of 50 to 55 and a flammability similar to gasoline, it has none of the additives found in modern gasoline and should not be used as a substitute for gasoline
Not sure why you posted the wiki link ?
As was mentioned regular gas would work but modern gas has many additives to make a car engine perform better. They certainly don't do anything positive for the food you cook with it.
 
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Old 08-22-16, 04:21 AM
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I guess some of you must think I am cooking Food directly over the flames. I Don't! I use this camping stove for pots and pan cooking. It is NOT a barbque, so I don't see how it endagers the food?
 
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Old 08-22-16, 06:58 AM
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Everyone uses pots and pans with a camp stove. Your pot is in the exhaust plume of the burner and the exhaust gasses waft into the skillet and I think some particulates condense. The end result is your food can end up with some funky spices.
 
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Old 05-07-18, 11:44 AM
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While it's easy to slip over the line into silliness about this, in general you do not want to use automotive fuels in your Coleman. Naptha or Coleman fuel is a first distillate of gasoline and has absolutely no additives. It is a very clean burning fuel that leaves no residue. And that is really the issue. I have found old stoves with 20+ year old Naptha fuel that works perfectly. If a tank of automotive type fuel is left in the tank within it will decompose into gum and varnish and make a mess of your stove or lantern appliance. In a pinch unleaded fuel is fine to use, although it may require more frequent cleaning of the generator. Be sure to run it dry, modern automotive fuels usually contain ethanol, another problematic additive from a storage standpoint. It will contribute to rust.
edit: Didn't realize at first this is a 2 year old post. Some forums don't get much traffic
 

Last edited by Tedsterr; 05-07-18 at 11:53 AM. Reason: NecroPosting
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Old 05-07-18, 12:03 PM
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Sometimes we forget to check the posting date.... no problem.
Thanks for the additional information on fuel choices.

This will remain in our searchable archives for future reference.
 
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