baseboard moulding

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  #1  
Old 11-02-02, 08:17 AM
bubckeyecal
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Question baseboard moulding

replacing new carpeting in whole house. currently have 2" mahoghany baseboard to be replaced with 3.5" coronado baseboard. Do I lay the baseboard on the floor or leave raise slightly for the carpet to go under? If raised, what do I do on hardwood and tile adjoining rooms where it will not be raised?
 
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Old 11-02-02, 04:16 PM
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Id leave the baseboard off until after the carpet is installed, for one reason. Crpet is put down with a tack strip around the room to allow the installer to stretch and hold the carpet in place. This tack strip makes it virtually impossible to place a bookscase up against a wall without shimming the front; the tack strip rasies the back.

Installing the baseboard last will cover part of the tack strip, at least alleviating part of the problem.

PS - if you raise the baseboard you shouldn't have a problem. Whether it's a cased opening or a regular door, baseboard doesn't normally go THROUGH a doorway - it stops at the trim framing the door (or doorway).
 
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Old 11-03-02, 05:42 PM
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Ordinarily, base is installed 1/2" above the floor for carpeting. The carpet will fill the space. On hard surface floors the base can be lower, but the quarter round sits on the floor after installation. There is no quarter round on carpet.
 
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Old 03-24-09, 01:31 PM
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Thumbs up better late than never

I am making this reply about 5 years too late for bubckeyecal but just in case anyone else happens along here:
the first answer does not take into consideration a wall that runs the length of two different rooms. Like my dining room wall, which runs uninterrupted into the kitchen. In the diningroom the base is above the carpet, in the kitchen the base is above the vinyl flooring - two quite different thicknesses and exactly what bubckeyecal was asking about. george completely blew that answer. 2nd, quarter round is not necessary if the base is thick enough to cover the join of the solid flooring at the wall. mostly quarter round is used to cover flooring installed up to the base.
hammering away in Sausalito
 
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Old 04-02-09, 10:48 AM
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bt - I agree about your first point. That's a little tougher situation. Maybe some kind of plinth block at the end of the vinyl floor to disguise the transition from carpet to vinyl? Or how about ripping the trim down a little shorter in the room with the carpet so the top of the trim stays in the same plane through both rooms?

On your second point, personally, I think quarter round looks better whether it's needed or not. It gives the room a more 'finished' look.
 
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Old 04-02-09, 07:24 PM
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I need an advice

Hello!
I'm new here. I've been browsing tons of forums for an idea of what to do. I was laid off from my job about 3 month ago. I've been looking for a job since then, but did not even get a single interview. I worked as a web designer for a publishing company for the last 5 years. Looks like forum.doityourself.com is an active forum with active members and may be someone has some experience working as a freelance web designer. May be "http://forum.doityourself.com/carpentry-woodworking/110871-baseboard-moulding.html#post1547899" category is not the most appropriate for this question, but I want to try anyways to get some opinions before I go ahead with my life. I'm wondering if it is possible in the current economy to find work for a freelance web designer and make enough to pay for rent and groceries. I was able to find a small project on craigslist and I developed a website for a company. It was a small project and took me only a week to complete. I got paid $800 for 1 week of work which is not bad. Please people give me some ideas. I have 2 kids and my wife is out of work as well. Thank you in advance.
 
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Old 04-10-09, 06:24 PM
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Talking irregular baseboard

First let me say that the trim at the floor in NOT quarter round! It is(or should be)shoe moulding. The reason for the shoe moulding was that as the floors, wall, base or whatever expanded and contracted, there would never be a gap. The shoe mould should be attached to the floor while the base is attached to the wall thereby creating a moveable trim to hide any imperfections.

Next, base is not usually applied on top of the carpet for the reason that if it were, you could not get the carpet out to replace it later. You CAN raise the baseboard a little to match the base in the rooms with no carpet, but the tack strip should be outside the base.
As for furniture againnst the wall, it really shouldn't be that close. The tack strip is only about 1 inch wide.

George is right about the base usually stopping at the doors. The only exception I can think of is an opening that is drywalled/plastered like an archway with no trim. Even then, I would stop the base and return it on itself.

Just my opinion!
 
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Old 04-11-09, 07:12 AM
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Shoe mold nailed to the floor? Really? I'm not a professional but I've never heard of that. I would think you'd nail it to the base molding so the floor can move underneath it and you'll never see a gap between the two. If you had painted trim then you'd see a dark gap around you're trim come and go as the floor moves and contracts over time.
 
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Old 04-14-09, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Crocostimpy View Post
Shoe mold nailed to the floor? Really? I'm not a professional but I've never heard of that. I would think you'd nail it to the base molding so the floor can move underneath it and you'll never see a gap between the two. If you had painted trim then you'd see a dark gap around you're trim come and go as the floor moves and contracts over time.
The shoe moulding is to HIDE the gap in the event that the floor moves.
 
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Old 04-14-09, 02:42 PM
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Never heard of shoe (or 1/4 round) nailed to the floor. What's the point, if the floor moves, then you have a gap between base and shoe/1/4 round. If you nail to the base, then you have the bottom width of the shoe/1/4 round to cover the expansion gap.

btw...1/4 round was used extensively where I used to work. I didn't like the look, but it was used. Matter of fact..most of the prefinished and flooring matched stuff (Pergo, Bruce, etc) was 1/4 round..not shoe.
 
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Old 01-13-10, 11:44 AM
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Quarter or Shoe?

I did a lot of the trim work back in the day (The older I get the better I used to be) and I was always interested in the history of construction and how home construction evolved. Worked on a bunch of much older homes, as well as newer ones, and always ran shoe molding rather than quarter. Quarter has a full radius profile while Shoe has about a 2:3 or greater ratio thickness to height, with the top edge rounded over. The reason for the shoe molding was that floors did move up and down a lot more, because the old building method was completely different. Wall studs, which were true 2" x 4", stood all the way from roof to the foundation sill and floor joists sat on a ledger attached at the correct height for the finished floor, or sat on the sill plate itself. Over time, the ledger could sag, or heavy furniture could cause the floor to sag away from the baseboard which was attached to the wall studs. Baseboard was usually 6" pine or hardwood, and shoe molding was as much as an inch high, almost like narrow baseboard itself. Sometimes we found baseboard floating a half inch or more above the floor with shoe molding tacked to a sleeper below it.
When those homes were built, plywood was not used, most often it was 8" shiplap run on the diagonal, there was no fire blocking in the walls, and carpenters built everything with hand tools.
When flooring changed from wood to carpet (only rich people could afford wall to wall carpet) we sometimes stood up a small plinth of the carpet edge trim just higher than the shoe molding, or mitered the end of the shoe at the carpet edge, so end grain didn't show. Sometimes we also ran a ripped piece of shoe on top of the carpet as well to make the transition look uniform.
 

Last edited by Sparksrick; 01-13-10 at 12:00 PM.
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Old 01-13-10, 12:41 PM
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This is an interesting thread. I've done countless trim jobs in many different type of homes (whether it was helping my contractor friends out or just doing a solid for my neighbors/ friends, or renovating a flip or my own home.

In twenty years I've never seen shoe replaced. When it was there, it was always replaced by quarter round. Gun makes a great point that all new flooring sold today by big box type stores sell quarter round that match their product. I've seen white base moldings installed with the Cherry/ mahogany/ oak quarter to match the floor. They were also always installed to the base as well, not the floor.

Now, the last post makes a good point that the floors of older homes would be more likely to sag due to how the construction was originally engineered. However, newer homes are built much more differently than they used to be and sagging floors are almost a thing of the past (assuming they were built correctly.)

Whenever I did a trim job for a pro, and carpet was going to be installed, we raised the base approximately the width of the bottom part of the base. (about a 1/4- 1/2") Basically we would put a length of base down on the floor and place the base on the wall resting on that piece on the floor. Shoe or quarter round was never used on carpeting although I saw work where it was. Usually when the base and shoe/ quarter was already there and they just carpeted to it. I saw a carpet installer install the carpet when we did this. He ran the tack strip flush to the base and left a little extra carpet to run past the strip. He then kicked it tight and just used a blade to push the extra under the gap of the base. It looked good. I don't know if it was "correct" but it looked seamless.

When I ran into issues with one wall hitting a transition from carpet to wood, I saw two things. First was raising the base on the hardwood floor to match the base coming off the carpet floor, then hiding the gap with the quarter. The other instance, the base would have to be raised so much higher because of the thickness of the carpet that the quarter round wouldn't be able to hide the gap, so they just returned the base on itself and ran the transition strips directly to the wall with a piece decoratively cut to fit between the returns running up the wall as high as the base. It looked good, just weird.

The thing I love about carpentry is the ideas you can come up with to solve problems. Some are aesthetically better, and others can be to just functionally solve a problem while still looking good.
 
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