repairing wood veneer on a cedar chest

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  #1  
Old 11-19-02, 12:07 PM
kakarrot62
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repairing wood veneer on a cedar chest

I have an old cedar chest covered with a walnut veneer. It has splintered and broken off in a spot about 2.5" wide. I want to cut this section out and replace it before I refinish the piece. What is the correct procedure to do this? I have already bought walnut veneer sheets. Do I cut a square piece a little bit bigger than the area I am looking to fix and then trace it with a razor knife to cut out the bad stuff? Or will the width of the razor knife create a small gap all of the way around which will show? Should I cut the piece along the grain as opposed to just cutting it square? I want to be sure before I start so I don't ruin this piece of furniture. It is very beautiful.
 
  #2  
Old 11-19-02, 04:08 PM
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Cutting a square piece invites attention to the repair as the 'patch' will break evenly across the grain lines.

A better method is to cut a diamond or lozenge shaped piece to stagger the cut edge along various lines.

Normally, even with careful emplacement of the repair piece, touchup is needed to blend the new into the old. I normally use artist oil colors, thinned very slightly with paint thinner to accomplish this task.

Do not try to touchup just the cut edges, but rather blend your touchup from the old into the new. This better disguises the repair itself.

Traditional colors for walnut (that I use) would include Van Dyke Brown, Burnt Umber, and Raw Sienna.

Go for the background color first - then add the grain lines. Feel free to create new 'grain lines' as need to further disguise the repair.

When doing this sort of work, after gluing the repair in place, I coat the area with an aerosol lacquer. This accomplishes two tasks at once. It lets me see the true color of the repair and surrounding wood, and seals the wood from color penetration from the touchup. While you're 'playing' with the background color, you can easily wipe mistakes off with a rag dampened with paint thinner. Once the background color is set, you can seal it with another lacquer coat and proceed to setting the grain lines, without fear of 'messing up' the background color already in place.

A final consideration is the thickness of the repair veneer. Many of the older pieces have an exceptionally thin veneer - today's are usually thicker. It may not be but a 64th of an inch, but it will make a difference. Some light sanding may be in order before the lacquer and touchup procedures outlined above in order to level the surface.

If you have any further questions, drop a line at this forum, or the furniture refinishing forum, which I moderate.
 
  #3  
Old 11-19-02, 05:11 PM
kakarrot62
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I am going to strip and refinish the entire piece of furniture. After I remove the old finish I was going to fix the veneer and then sand and put a polyurethane finish on it. do i really need to go through all of that?
 
  #4  
Old 11-20-02, 10:39 AM
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It's a mater of esthetics; if you're satisfied with what the repair looks like without any touchup, then no, all you need to do is finish it.
 
  #5  
Old 11-20-02, 11:42 AM
kakarrot62
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ok, great. thanks for your help!
 
  #6  
Old 12-01-02, 06:02 PM
L
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another way.

is to bevel the edges of the existing veneer around the area where the veneer is missing by an 1/8".
then cut a piece to fit that over laps by 1/4 inch all the way around. be sure you have the grain in the right direction.
turn the new piece of veneer over and bevel the edges 1/4".
to bevel the edges you can use a sander, i use porter cable model 330, 1/4 sheet sander. i use the corner of the sander to do my beveling with.
hopefully you have access to clamp.
you apply glue to the piece that is being repaired and to the underside of the ''patch''
carefully put in place and cover with a piece of plastic then a
''glue block'' which you use to clamp. you will most likely need another glue block at the other end of the clamp.
i clamp briefly then release and clean up the glue ''gently'' with a
damp rag, (less sanding later, also, checks to make sure the ''patch'' is in the correct place).
after the glue has dried, i wait longer than necessary, just to be sure, you will now sand the overlapping piece around the edges untill you have a flat piece, if done right it is very hard to see the repair. you are just sanding the 1/8 inch overlap untill flat then sand over the whole patch. if you sand too much you may end up
with glue lines, so work up , that is, sand less and check vs. sand a lot and then check, saves having to do it again, which would entail cuting a piece of the veneer out and starting over.
the plastic keeps the ''glue block'' from being glued to the veneer.
the glue block needs to extend around the piece being glued by a couple inches. also, straight lines draw your eye to the repair, so leave the patch irregular.
have fun
randal
 
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Old 12-02-02, 07:43 AM
kakarrot62
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thanks alot! I will give it a try.
 
  #8  
Old 12-02-02, 03:58 PM
L
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use 220 paper to sand with.
 
 

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