Is there an alternative to contact cement for veneer?

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Old 02-10-03, 05:37 PM
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Is there an alternative to contact cement for veneer?

I am attempting to install wood veneer to my cabinets and drawers. The cabinets and drawers have wood frames so I have to lay the veneer inside. It is very hard to get the veneer positioned correctly and the contact cement does not allow for adjustments. I went through 3 drawer fronts (the drawer fronts are cut correctly). Is there another adhesive that allows for adjustments?
 
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Old 02-10-03, 06:04 PM
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The original adhesive uswed for veneer was hide glue. It's still available from specialty shops catering to the refinisher. It's smelly, and not as strong as contact cement, but it gives you plenty of time to 'play' with the veneer to correctly position it.

try these two sources if it's not available locally.

http://www.vandykes.com

http://www.liberon.com
 
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Old 02-10-03, 08:12 PM
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Yellow wood glue such as titebond with just a tad of water added to it will give you more open time than contact cement, but less than hide glue.
 
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Old 02-15-03, 07:57 AM
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Problems veneering larger pieces

I played with the contact cement some more and got the hang of it for most of my cabinet doors and drawers.

Now I have run into problems working on larger pieces: a pantry door (48.25" x 16.125") and two large cabinet doors (27.5" x 22.25"). I messed up putting on the pantry veneer on correctly and took 4 hours using an electric sander removing the contact cement (that was really fun).

Now I am aprehensive to use the contact cement on the larger pieces because I don't want to waste half the day removing the contact cement as well as wasting more veneer.

I experimented with wood glue on a small test piece as chfite suggested. However the 1/24" veneer creeped on the sides even with rolling out the veneer and weighing it down. I also noticed that moisture bled through the veneer.

George suggested using hide glue. I am unfamiliar with hide glue.

Will hide glue creep like an acordian like wood glue?

What is the process of applying hide glue? Does it involve a veneer hammer? Heat?
 
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Old 02-15-03, 11:03 AM
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If you are interested in trying the yellow glue. Apply it, then iron with a steam iron set to cotton. This will force the water out without having to let it set up. Just letting it dry wastes time and won't insure good contact. Trying to roll it causes it to slip. Position the piece with the glue on it and pin it in position in the center and work from there out.
 
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Old 02-15-03, 01:03 PM
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two other options

first one:
appy the contact cement and let dry..
lay wax paper on the door leaving an inch of cement on the top front edge....set the veneer on the sheet and align the top edge...Press the top down..pull the plastic out from the bottom.
or use paint sticks aligned every few inches.

Second one:
get a laminate trimmer. apply the veneer to the door leaving over hand on the sides and trim with a laminate trimmer. This works for frames as well.....
cut, apply trim........
 
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Old 02-15-03, 01:40 PM
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All of the previous suggestion are good - but inanswer to the question about hide glue, not it doesn't alligator the veneer. It does, however, require clamping.

The original hide glue required heating; current variations come ready made in a squeeze bottle (just like carpenters glue). It does require either rolling out or a laminate hammer. Best is clamping the entire surface under uniform pressure (not easy in some instances, I'll admit).
 
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Old 02-15-03, 03:33 PM
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Cool Thank you for your help

First of all thank you for all your help.

The problem has been solved. I used StephenS's first suggestion except I used contractor paper which can be cut to exact size of the cabinet doors. The paper slightly sticks to the contact cement which makes it easy to control. Contractor paper can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes for less than $9 in rolls of 37 inches by 100+ feet.



P.S.

Titebond hide glue can be found at Ace Hardware or Truevalue Hardware for about $3.50 for 4 oz. I bought it but did not have to use it.
 
 

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