fancy table is dented

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Old 11-12-03, 06:41 AM
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Unhappy fancy table is dented

Please,help.Kids dented very nice tabletop.It's wooden,and I recall that there is a way to raise the wood graine back up.They made multiple dents.I MUST fix it,it doesn't belong to me!What is the fix?Something pops in mind-is it steaming to get the grain rase up? Please ,help !!! (if I'm at the wrong forum, please direct me to the correct one )
 
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Old 11-12-03, 07:19 AM
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Trying to raise dents in a finished piece can be difficult, because the finish resists the movement of moisture through itself. Shallow dents are easier to raise than sharp-cornered dents or holes.

Use mineral spirits to remove any wax or oils from the surface of the piece. Put a drop of water or so on the dented area for a few minutes and wait. Just enough water to cover the dented area. After about 5 minutes, wipe it up and check to see if if has helped. If there is damage to the finish, the water may be able to seep through and raise some of the grain. You may want to repeat this several times, if it helps. There may be some improvement.

Steaming works in the same manner, but may damage the finish. Lay a terry cloth item over the area and iron over it with a clothes iron set to steam. Make a pass, then remove the iron and the cloth. If this works, it will be gradual. Avoid heating the finish and the wood overmuch.

If neither of these produces any benefit, and they may well not work, stripping the finish and following the same procedure will give better results. Not all damage to wood can be repaired without stripping or filling or sanding.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 11-12-03, 04:27 PM
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Do I have a better chance if I'll use hot or boiling water?
 
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Old 11-12-03, 09:50 PM
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Actually, the hot water would likely damage the finish. The wood will either absorb the water or not. Leaving the water on the surface for a long time will result in white water marks.

The prospect of successfully raising the dent in the finished piece is not reassuring. Even if it is stripped, some damage cannot be repaired.

My grandson has done the same thing to our kitchen table. We got it after the children left. I plan to strip it and refinish it to provide a new look. The dings and such will have to remain as marks of character.

Sorry that I cannot be more reassuring.
 
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Old 11-13-03, 05:09 PM
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Chris, thank you very much.I'll give it a try.Hope for the best.
 
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Old 11-13-03, 07:49 PM
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Furniture dents

Use lukewarm water as instructed with repeat applications. The finish will tend not to be as resilient as wood if you can get it to swell enough to miminize the dent. Proceed with caution if applying heat. Use a warm iron and hold for only a few seconds. Repeat. If no progress is made, accept the dent as character. Even with sanding and refinishing the damage may tend to remain apparent. Remember, a 'distressed finish' remains popular. Table cloths, runners, and placements are good for covering damage as well as for providing protection on tables.
 
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Old 11-14-03, 01:35 AM
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Thank you,Twelvepole
 
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Old 11-16-03, 01:22 PM
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Irina:

I had once tried to do what you are trying and found the area looked worse as the wood leveled somewhat but the finish deteriorated in the repaired areas.
It would have looked better if I had left it alone.
 
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Old 11-16-03, 06:20 PM
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Thank you,GregH.I didn't get started yet. I've been concerned about making it looking worse On the other hand,if it helps...Is it worth the risk?I'm not sure.Anyone with positive expirience?
 
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Old 11-16-03, 09:14 PM
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Irina:

One thing you havn't mentioned is the depth of the dent.
Is it deeper than the thickness of a piece of paper?
Place a straightedge across the dent and use something to guage it.
The deeper it is the less are your chances of sucess.
 
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Old 11-17-03, 08:27 PM
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Piece of paper!.. I would not worry much about that...No,it's really deep,about 2-3 mm.
 
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