nail gun sizes

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-09-04, 02:35 PM
TKEcowboy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
nail gun sizes

I am a bit confused by the different nail gun sizes. What type of nail gun do I need for building cabinets, putting up trim, etc. Would it be a brad or finish nailer? Thanks.

Glenn
 
  #2  
Old 01-09-04, 04:34 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 9,483
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I like a finish nailer for those projects. I have the Bostich N60FN. It is 15 guage.
 
  #3  
Old 01-11-04, 10:32 AM
Tom_J
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
For trim, definitely the finish nailer.

For cabinets, I, personally, would be reluctant to use anything larger than my brad nailer. It's a considerably smaller tool allowing you to get into those "tight" places, gives more control (for me, anyway) and will shoot much shorter nails than a finish nailer can.

If your budget can stand the hit, I would recommend getting both, or perhaps you might start with the nailer that will serve your most immediate needs and pick up the second down the road, which is what I did.

Tom

P.S. Bostitch, among others, makes a brad nailer which will shoot 5/8" brads. My P-C BN200 will only go as short as 3/4". Next time, I'm going with a nailer that will shoot the shorter 5/8" brads, for what it's worth.
 

Last edited by Tom_J; 01-11-04 at 04:53 PM.
  #4  
Old 01-11-04, 08:50 PM
Dave_D1945's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 1,178
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I use a Bostich brad nailer for all my cabinetry work. It handles between 5/8" and 2" 18 ga brads. It's fantastic!!
 
  #5  
Old 01-13-04, 09:23 PM
Furniture Bldr
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I use a senco staple gun for assembling cabinetry then I screw it together. Where applicable, I dado the side into the top and bottom "Finished End" then I staple and screw it from the top and bottom side.

Anything more than a brad nailer for moldings is overkill. Are we building houses or cabinetry.

I use my 18 guage brad nailer for crown, etc. Just put a little Poly Seam Seal behind it, mark your studs and away you go.
 
  #6  
Old 01-19-04, 10:14 PM
dandb
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
My vote is for a 18 gauge brad nailer also. I try to stay away from nails the best I can, but sometime they're the best choice, when there's not an easy way to clamp things. If you can glue and clamp, it's worth the extra time it takes....looks nicer and is much stronger.
 
  #7  
Old 01-20-04, 11:07 AM
Furniture Bldr
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Last night, I just sold a $12,000.00 job $9,000.00 of it was the Home Theater.

In our earlier that day discussion at my shop, I told the client that I dado, glue and clamp whenever I can and the only nails that would be in his unit would be the crown which I have no choice but to nail; since the unit goes from the floor to the ceiling.

I told him "Which is true" Most cabinetry shops will just nail the columns together putty the holes and out the door it goes.

I believe the less nails you use, goes to show the higher quality the piece will be. Who wants to spend $9,000.00 of their hard earned money on a wall unit that is filled with nails. I sure as heck wouldn't, as I would be furious.

In my trade, there will always be someone who's willing to do a job cheaper, whether it would be: Nailing the unit together, cheap materials, cheap hardware, 15 guys working on one project, and many other reasons.
 
  #8  
Old 01-20-04, 01:19 PM
dandb
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I know exactly what you mean, and agree with you fully. I am a small, 1-person (in my case woman), woodworking business. I always have a list of people waiting for me to get to their project. A lot of my customers say they don't care if they have to wait, they want my quality. My quality and the fact that I can customize anything to meet their need are my selling points. The only time I ever use nails are (like you said) to put crown on and I use them to hold drawer boxes, while the glue is drying. I have found that a statement my woodworking instructor said to me once is very true. He said if you do a good job of gluing, the glue joint is actually stronger than the wood itself. I have dropped glued pieces before and the wood itself broke, not the glued joint. You can't say that about nailed joints (not to mention the unsightly holes.)
 
  #9  
Old 01-20-04, 03:04 PM
Furniture Bldr
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Do you just butt joint your drawers? I use a pre-finished birch and bottom for my drawers. I dado my drawers together so I don't see any nails on the sides. It gets glued and nailed from the front and the back so there aren't any visable nails.

I used to make my own drawers in the sense of cutting them out of a full sheet, edgebanding the top, and cutting the groove. That got really old and I was spending so much time doing it because I'd have to finish it too. I can make just as good of a drawer in the prefinished as one that would match the outside of the unit. If the customer wants to "UPGRADE" and go with drawers that match the unit, then that's fine too. Most people don't care too much about what the drawer looks like. They just want a drawer that is easy to clean, slides nice, and the bottom won't fall out. I currently use Accuride's 3832's self-closing, but I think im going to switch to Blum Motion.
 
  #10  
Old 01-22-04, 09:56 AM
dandb
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I use 1/2" Baltic Birch plywood for my drawer boxes. I leave them the light color. I put a rabbet on the front end of the sides for the front to fit in, and a dado 1/2" from the back for the back to fit in. On larger drawers I use the birch for the bottom. (Glued and dadoed into the sides and front.) Small drawers I sometimes use 1/4" tempered masonite for the bottom, constructed the same way. On most drawers I rip a 3/4 x 3/4 triangle out of pine (pine, because it's light colored) the same length and the height of the drawer and glue in the front corners of the drawer box. This is a little inconvenient sometimes to have the triangle in the corners, but makes a very strong box. Before I put the drawers together I use a small round-over bit and round inside & outside top edges of the sides and back, and the inside edge of the front. I think this gives the drawer a nicer finished look rather than leaving the square edges.
I used to rabbet the edges of the front and fit the sides into this rabbet. I changed to rabbeting the side and fit the front into it. The good thing about this is when you pull on the drawer front, your not pulling the same way the nails went in, your pulling sideways on the nail. True, the nail holes show from the side, but I think the added strength is worth it. Also I have heard some people say they don't glue the bottom in. I glue it in the dado. Especially with the 1/2" material, it really makes a solid box.
 
  #11  
Old 01-22-04, 11:08 AM
Furniture Bldr
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Gluing the bottoms in is a NO NO.

Same concept as gluing the panel of a door to the stiles and rails, You never do it.

You need to allow it to expand and contract or you could end up with splitting problems and drawer functionability.

I deal with a high-end type of clientele and some of them DO check to see how I constructed to drawer and look for nails.

I had one customer whos relative is a carpenter; who came by to see the job I did on their wall unit. He looked and looked and looked for nails throughout the job and couldn't find any. "That's because there wern't any!"

Quality my friend. If you glue and nail it from the face, you won't have any problems unless they abuse it. Trust me, if you come by and see the drawer face and face of drawer detached and the whole inside is all blown out near the face, you'll know it was abuse. I've never had a drawer come apart on me.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: