Coping Trim When Angle Isn't 90 Degrees

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Old 02-16-04, 10:39 AM
M
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Coping Trim When Angle Isn't 90 Degrees

I'm getting ready to finish the trim in my wife's art studio. I've done a lot of coping before, but never when the walls aren't at a 90 degree angle. Will coping still work? I have one wall that meets another at a 45 degree angle, and another place where two walls are at about a 135 degree angle.
 
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Old 02-16-04, 07:10 PM
Tom_J
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md,

My thinking is that coping is exactly the right place for your project.

Much as we expound on power tools around here, there's no substitute for the use of hand tools where the need warrants it.

The 45-degree cut should give you no problem. On the 135-degree angle, try back-cutting, i.e. cope away from the face of the moulding, to give yourself a tight fit. (Not a bad idea any time, but on non-regular angles, it helps a lot!)

Tom
 
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Old 02-17-04, 03:20 AM
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Thank you for the reply. However, I still am uncertain at what angle to cut the piece I'm coping so it will fit. For a 90 degree corner, of course, the piece to be coped is cut at 45 degrees. What angle(s) would I use for my "non-standard" corners?

I'm sure I could experiment with this and figure it out, but I'm hoping for a quick answer (aren't we all).
 
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Old 02-17-04, 05:06 PM
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You would make the face cut at 45 degrees as Tom_J mentioned, but need to cope more of an angle back into the remaining wood to get the fit at 135 degrees.

The 45 degree angle would work with the 45 degree cut. The coped piece will angle onto the other and make a tight fit.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 02-17-04, 05:43 PM
Tom_J
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Okay.

The "quick" answer is one-half of your large angle. If it's 135 degrees then half would be 67.5 degrees. Back-cut slightly to ensure that the moulding faces meet the way you want them to.

Ahhh... You have a really weird angle, eh?

If you have a bevel gauge (that thingie with the slotted blade, a handle and a thumbscrew), fit it to your large angle. Trace the angle onto a piece of poster board or cardboard. From the vertex of the angle (the point of the "V"), measure down an equal distance on both sides of the angle. (A compass makes this even easier.)

Draw a straight line connecting the points you made on the lines of your large angle. (You should now have a triangle with two equal sides...isoceles, for those taking notes ). Find the midpoint of the base of the triangle and draw a line from the vertex of the large angle through that midpoint. These two lines will be perpendicular to one another and will have split your large angle in half.

Now, the reason I suggested poster board, or cardboard, is that you can cut along one side of the large angle and along the line that splits your large angle in half and use it as a template to mark your moulding. Obviously, this method will only be as accurate as you are but, it should put you pretty darned close to where you need to be.

Probably gave you "War and Peace" rather than "Reader"s Digest" but I hope it helps.

Tom
 
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Old 02-17-04, 07:01 PM
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Tom,

I like your idea....

How about using a "thinner" piece of card board that you can just fold in half, rather than cutting. (not sure but it seems like I've seen this somewhere).
 
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Old 02-17-04, 07:19 PM
Tom_J
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Steve,

Don't see why not. Improve on my suggestion any way you can.

Ain't nuthin' written in stone out here.

Whatever gets the job done for you.

Tom
 
 

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