Help! Crown Moulding Ceiling Not Level

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-11-04, 08:44 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Help! Crown Moulding Ceiling Not Level

I'm trying to install crown moulding. However, the ceiling is not level on one end by almost 5/8 of an inch. If I use that measurement to level the moulding from, I'll have about 1/2 to 5/8 inch gap above the moulding for most of the ceiling. If I don't level the moulding along the walls, will it be noticeable? What do the pros do with a situation like this?
 
  #2  
Old 09-12-04, 06:51 AM
Dave_D1945's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 1,178
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Don't get too obsessed with 'level' on your crown. Put it in so it contacts the ceiling and lays against the wall at the correct angle. Nail it just enough to hold it firmly in place, then use a good painters caulk to fill the gaps you'll have due to wavy walls or ceilings. In most rooms, a 5/8" variation from dead level will never be noticed.
 
  #3  
Old 09-12-04, 07:21 AM
Lugnut's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Kansas City, Missouri.
Posts: 1,170
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I agree with Dave. Crown is commonly (fitted first, then) nailed at one end and then hand bent, hand twisted and nailed as needed as you work down the length of the crown toward the opposite end. This is possible because crown is thin and very long. If you are working with a short piece, then you must get creative.

As a tip, know in advance where your ceiling joists are. The crown that installs parallel to the to joists (2 of the 4 room walls), sometimes can only be nailed into the wall and not the ceiling because there is no nailer present.
 
  #4  
Old 09-12-04, 09:58 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the insight. I think I can fudge it enough to get the gap within 1/4 inch or so due to the waviness of the ceiling. I'm painting the molding, so it won't be too noticeable. Also, the crown is sitting on upside base molding, (that is level) so I'll at least have a good nailer at the bottom. Wish me luck!
 
  #5  
Old 09-12-04, 07:44 PM
Dave_D1945's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 1,178
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Another problem with installing crown molding is that you sometimes can't nail where you really need to. I get around this by putting up a nailing strip before I start hanging the crown. The strip is cut narrow enough so the crown will hide it and nailed into the wall top plate and/or the top of the studs. With the nailing strip, I can nail my crown wherever I need to and know that there's a solid nailing surface behind it. I can also nail through the 'belly' and not risk damaging the detailing at the top or bottom.

I got this tip (and a few hundred others) from a book I got at Home Depot. "Crown Molding & Trim - Install It Like A Pro".

By the way Mark..........if you're going to paint the crown, use just enough nails to keep it up and then use a painters caulk to hide the gaps along the top and bottom. You'll drive yourself bananas if you try to close every little gap as you nail it off.
 
  #6  
Old 09-12-04, 07:57 PM
Lugnut's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Kansas City, Missouri.
Posts: 1,170
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I like the home depot books. I built my large shed (small garage) from there plans. I did take a crown moulding class about 3 years ago but don't have my notes anymore, blah, blah, blah. I like (or recall) the sub-nailer strip idea.
I'm not a professional, but I have a contractor for a friend and spend all my time in the shop. (uh , or did, mmm, whatever).
 
  #7  
Old 09-13-04, 06:51 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Dumb question -- but is there a difference between "painters caulk" and the basic latex caulk I can get at Home Depot? My house is five yrs. old and when removing some molding the builders put on, I noticed that it is thick, strong and rubbery -- doesn't seem like the stuff I usually use.
 
  #8  
Old 09-13-04, 10:05 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 102
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Mark, yes, you want to make sure you get painters caulk if you are going to paint it. My brother once made a late night error when caulking seems in his new kitchen and the paint did not take at all. Became a bit of a headache.
 
  #9  
Old 09-14-04, 01:26 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The crown looks great! The gap between the relief of the upside down base and the bottom of the crown is around 1-3/8", which is a little wider than I'd like aesthetically (it's around 1" in other areas of the house), but overall it looks nice. I limited the gap to around 3/8" at it's largest point. I packed it with Durabond joint compound (20 min.) and will go back over with interior spackle and then caulk. Thanks for the help everyone.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: