replacing stair parts... veneer?

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  #1  
Old 09-15-04, 04:35 AM
madeira
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replacing stair parts... veneer?

Sorry if this has been covered before... I looked through a few pages and couldn`t see anything.

I just pulled glued-on carpeting off my stairs. In the process, most of the veneer on the risers was damaged, and I`ll need to fix it. I can deal with the treads, I hope... (gah! Carpet glue is tough!)

My question: Should I just glue/tack new veneer onto the existing stuff? How? I can`t see any nails/tacks in the current veneer... so how did they put it in?
 
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Old 09-15-04, 12:12 PM
S
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I have some questions.
1) Are the treads hardwood or fir plywood?
2) Do the treads have a rounded wood edging extending out over the riser,
or are they square edge?
3) At the bottom of the staircase, what is the height of the first tread above
the finished floor and from the top of the 1st tread to the top of the 2nd
tread.
 
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Old 09-16-04, 04:47 AM
madeira
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stairs

Hi again!

Answers: The treads are 1 1/4" solid wood, although not hardwood... I think. They`re not plywood, anyways...

The edges are square, and extend about an inch.

The bottom of the first tread is 6 1/4" from the floor.

All the other treads are 8 1/4" from the top of one to the top of the next.
 
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Old 09-16-04, 01:07 PM
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HI madeira, I have the exact same problem. We just pulled up a rug that covered our stairs too. We have glue all over the riser and treads.

Our treads have a rounded wood edging extending out over the riser, not sure what type of wood it is though. We plan on cutting 1/4" wood, paint it and cover the risers. That will take care of the riser but the treads are in bad shape too, lots of glue. I was hoping that someone made some kind of thin wood veneer caps to place of the existing treads. Please post back if you find a good solution to our problem. I will do the same.

Thanks
 
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Old 09-16-04, 08:22 PM
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Your staircase is constructed from nominal dimentioned framing lumber, probably douglas fur.
You'll first need to scrape off the glue residue and then sand. At this point you can paint, stain and seal, seal, replace, veneer, tacked, not glued center carpet runner with finished wood sides, lots of possibilities.
 
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Old 09-18-04, 10:43 AM
madeira
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stripper is HARSH!! But works!

I got most/all the glue off today, using a chemical stripper and a wire brush. The treads all look pretty good; I`ll need to put wood filler in just a few places.

For the risers, I`m planning to just glue in new veneer. I`ll throw a few nails at sections that aren`t flush enough.

Thanks, Snoonyb... I think I understood part of what you were saying!
 
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Old 09-18-04, 05:33 PM
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When attaching veneer to the riser, be careful not deminish the tread width to narrower then the minimum.
If you are going stain, seal and finish or just clear coat, use a urethane or a product such as "Dura-flor" or marine spar varnish. Use numerous coats to protect the tread nose from shredding and splintering. Or you may even use any number of matal tread noseings to protect that area.
 
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Old 09-19-04, 09:57 AM
madeira
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Sorry to be a pain... but if you`re talking about a minimum length for the treads to overlap the risers... What is it? Even the thickest veneer will leave me with 7/8ths of an inch. (I`m planning to use pretty thin veneer, though..)

What exactly is Marine spar varnish? Does it dry hard?

I`ve done floors with Varathane and water-based urathane before, and have had adhesion problems. (Tacky forever.. and probably my fault... but I couldn`t figure out the reasons.)

I was thinking about staining and waxing this time.

Bad idea?
 
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Old 09-19-04, 03:01 PM
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As I recall, the minimum tread width is 9" measured from the face of the riser to the edge of the tread noseing.

Marine spar varnish is an excellant finish material and is applied in a minimum of three applications. The 1st is thinned 50%, the 2nd is thinned 25% and successive coates are applied full strength. As it ages, it will impart a rich umber tone.

Full drying between coates is essential.

The caution should be in the understanding that the dimentional lumber used in framing is not as hard as oak, teak, or mahogony, and with wear will splinter and shread at the tread noseing, which is the area of "greatest moment" in stair traffic.
 
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Old 09-22-04, 04:00 AM
sawdustdog
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veneer comes in thickness of about 1/16" or less. You can get a veneer with a glue backing. This can be applied using a normal clothes iron. You'll also need a J-roller to roll out the air pockets.

This is the same process as installing linoleum or "Formica", ie, rolling the veneer. So instructions on linoleum installation should explain the rolling process.

First apply the veneer with an iron. Then start on one end heating up the veneer. about the length of the iron. Roll the venner towards the end opposite from where you started. move over a couple inches less than the iron length and heat it up and roll.

I wouldn't trust this glued veneer on the treads since I doubt it's made to with stand the long time forces associated with climbing up & down stairs. But you can always contact the manufacturer and ask. They more than likely also make glueless veneer so ask them what kind of glue to apply the veneer on stair treads. The glue is applied just like laying linoleum and the veneer is rolled same.

Don't nail the veneer!!!!!!!!

Veneer is so thin that you wouldn't be able to sink the nails enough to putty the holes. You'll end up cracking the veneer around the nail resulting in the nail not doing anything.

I don't know how you plan to cover the tread edge but you could glue a strip onto the edge a little wider than the thickness of the tread and carefully trim it with a sharp utility knife or razo blade. leave a little on the top side and sand it down.

By sanding using a rolling motion from the top of the tread down the edge you can make it look like a solid piece.

When I make interrier oak door frames I use oak plywood and put this type of veneer on the edges and sand it down as i mentioned. You can't tell it's veneer. The door jamb looks like solid oak and is more stable than using solid oak. Solid oak would require putting dados down the length of the jamb on the back in order to prevent warping and buckling. Using plywood is also much cheaper.

You may want to do the edges first then when laying the veneer on the tread you can leave it a little long to sand as I mentioned above. Leaving the veneer a little long will also help if the tread between the stringers isn't square. Leaves a little wiggle room And if you find getting the joint betwen the riser and tread difficult to look good, you can always use some quater round as trim. Adding trim makes things look nicer and hides a lot of evil

Oh yeah, make sure the surface the veneer is adhering to is free of all residue from the glue. Sand it good and the last sanding use no more than 100 grit sandpaper. The rougher the better.

Then make sure the surface is free from dust and dirt. You can use a damp rag to remove any dust/dirt. Let things dry before applying glue. If a damp rag is used It'll only take a few minutes.
 

Last edited by sawdustdog; 09-22-04 at 04:22 AM.
  #11  
Old 10-04-04, 12:27 AM
hardwoodman
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The best bet and probably the most economical would be to buy finish grade plywood to make your risers. A lot cheaper than veneer.
 
 

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