chair rail help!!!!!

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Old 10-24-04, 10:53 AM
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chair rail help!!!!!

We just put chair rail down our hallway. The problem is, that when you look down the hallway the chair rail looks wavy. Did we do something wrong, or is it just the way the walls are? Is there any tricks we could use to hide this? I figure there must be a way around it, as so many people have it, and everyones walls can't be perfect. Thanks for your help.
Tammy
 
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Old 10-24-04, 02:58 PM
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Chair rails are primarily ornamental now, but once protected the room walls from the back of dining/living room chair backs.

I don't recall seeing any chair rail moliding down a hallway(no chairs).
I don't think there is a trick to correcting waviness down a long hallway.
I'd remove it and simply paint the walls if it's needed.

my opinion,
fred
 
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Old 10-24-04, 06:34 PM
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Tammy,

Unless the walls are perfectly straight and not wavy, it is nearly impossible to hide the wavyness of a chair rail attached to it. It's not as apparent in a square room, where you are not actually looking down the length of the rail from most any angle in the room, if you are, you're looking a little to close.

Of course, in a hallway, you can't help but look down the total length of it, so any imperfection will be apparent.

Is this a large hallway, maybe part of an entryway where you need chairs anyway? If not, as Fred said, why the rail?
 
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Old 10-24-04, 06:50 PM
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The only way you can get the look of the chair rail without the wavyness. Is to remove the wood chair rail and replace it with a wallpaper border with a complimenting wallpaper below it. Any imperfections will be hidden by the length of the strips from floor to border.
 
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Old 10-25-04, 06:48 AM
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Welcome to one of the most aggravating parts of finish carpentry - the sudden realization that there ain't no such thing as a straight (flat) wall.

If you're painting your chair rail, the solution is simple - use a good painters caulk along the top and bottom to hide the gaps. Unless the gaps are really big, you'll never notice them.
 
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Old 10-28-04, 02:07 PM
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Of course I couldn't do it the easy way, with the paintable chair rail. I am using the, would you say, plastic moulding that is finished white. Don't take me as being stupid, but even if I was to use the paintable mouldings, how could you nail it straight to the wall. We nailed it in at every stud. Would you do less nailing so it would hold the linear effect better, and the caulk it?
I really appreciate the help.
Tammy
 
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Old 10-28-04, 08:01 PM
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Any chance of talking you into ripping out the plastic cr#p and putting in either primed pine or primed MDF?

Another possible solution would be to caulk then paint the chair rail with that Krylon paint for plastic. I've never used it but I hear it works. It would get a bit messy since it only comes in spray cans. If you have any leftover scraps of the molding you could try it and see if you like it.
 
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Old 10-29-04, 06:22 PM
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Hi, Just an idea. You can't make the chair rail less wavey so maybe you can make it less noticeable.How about making picture frame with the type of rail you are using say about 10"x20". A couple put on the wall with the inside painted different colors would pull your eye to them and not the wavey rail. You could make them different sizes in a combination. You are only limited by your own imagination.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 
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Old 10-30-04, 02:49 AM
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Set a block or other similar temporary attachment device at either end of the straight run, so that a string can be tightly pulled at a distance of 2" from the wall.
Where there is no return wall at either end of a straight wall, set the moulding tite to the wall and along the continious distance shim to straight, nail, caulk and paint.
Granted, there is only so much you can accomplish. So in the event that there is "no" distance between the wall and the string, you might consider paneled wainscoting or faux wainscoting by using just the moulding to create symetrical "picture frames" below the chair rail, which will draw the eye away from the chair rail.
 
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Old 11-05-04, 07:41 AM
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I would take a 4' level and place it on the chair rail. Then look for the spots that wave and mark them with tape. Then pop loose the chair rail at or around those spot. You may need to drive the nail all the way through into the wall and patch that spot and drive the new nail lower or higher from the old one. Place the level back on the chair rail and straighten it out The nail it back in with someone else holding the chair rail flush with the level. This should help take out the wave.
 
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