New to woodworking...

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-13-04, 10:10 AM
Still Learnin
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
New to woodworking...

I am new to woodworking and am getting very interested in starting a project. I want to build kitchen cabinets. But before I embark on this odessy, I would like to get some input from you pros out there on how best to approach this. This will not be a time sensitive project as I am simply upgrading (I hope) , so I'd like to do something special. I'd appreciate any ideas and/or suggestions.

Thanx
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-13-04, 10:35 AM
Herm's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Island Lake, IL
Posts: 535
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Still Learnin,

Welcome to the forum!

Kitchen cabinets are not as easy of a project as they may look like. I know they are just boxes, with face frames attached, but there is a lot to it for somebody that is new to woodworking.

There is the consideration of tools. If you don't have them already, tools can are a major expense. There are a lot of other major things to consider as well.

Knowledge of construction is a major one.
Room to work.
Finishing
Hardware
Moulding
Lighting?
Door construction, or measuring accurately to be ableto order them from somebody.
Drawers
Installation

This is a short list.

When you say you are new to woodworking, I'm assuming that you don't have knowledge of any of these issues. Hopefully, I am wrong.

I would recomend buying some books that have information about this, and doing much research before trying to tackle a project of this magnatude.

I don't have a resource for such books off the top of my head, but I will post some in this thread if I run accross any. You could do an internet search too. I'm sure you'll find something.


Good luck, and post again!


I
 
  #3  
Old 12-13-04, 03:45 PM
Dave_D1945's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 1,178
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Kitchen cabinets isn't a project I would recommend to a beginner. Yes, they're "just boxes", but building a square box isn't as easy as it seems. Add in making doors (more "square stuff" ) and you have a recipe for some serious frustration. And I won't even get into staining and finishing.

I would suggest that you get a few woodworking magazines and build something you see (and like) in one of them.........maybe a simple table or bookcase. You may even want to build a couple of things in pine so you can toss them if they don't turn out right and you're not out piles of money for expensive wood.

Those cabinets can be out there for you, but they're firmly attached to the walls and are highly visible. Practice on simpler things so that when you finally do your cabinets you can show them off.........blush a little.......drag your toe across the floor..............and say "Aww, t'wern't nothin".
 
  #4  
Old 12-13-04, 04:08 PM
Sawdustguy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Just as important as making sure your appliances fit is to know how to make a square box. I wouldn't even trust a framing square. I went through 8 of them before I found a square one at the store.

If your boxes aren't square and your doors aren't square, it will look terrible.

Dave, Herm and I all do this for a living and I wouldn't suggest you attempt this either, unless you have money to back it up just incase u need to order a kitchen from Home Depot, etc.
 
  #5  
Old 12-13-04, 04:26 PM
Dave_D1945's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 1,178
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
order a kitchen from Home Depot

Go wash your mouth out with soap!!!

It only took me three tries to find a square square
 
  #6  
Old 12-13-04, 04:30 PM
Sawdustguy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Muahahahaha! Dave.

Do I at least get to use water?

It's pretty amazing how if your cabinet is even off 1/32" out of square, how it
can look bad and start to mirror the rest of the cabinets along side of it. It's a total snowball effect.
 
  #7  
Old 12-13-04, 05:32 PM
Herm's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Island Lake, IL
Posts: 535
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Sawdustguy

It's pretty amazing how if your cabinet is even off 1/32" out of square, how it
can look bad and start to mirror the rest of the cabinets along side of it. It's a total snowball effect.
Been there, done that.

What I like (right) about woodworking, is that you have the ability to screw up the job anywhere from the begining to the end of the project. Each step can has to be carefully planned and performed, otherwise your back to step one. Although, the more experienced I get, the better I can fix and/or hide my mistakes.




I planned to do that.....

Yeah, that's the ticket.
 
  #8  
Old 12-13-04, 05:36 PM
Sawdustguy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Being a good cabinetmaker/woodworker isn't being knowledgable on how to build different things, etc, rather it's knowing how to fix your mess-ups without having to remake the part.

You can be the best cabinetmaker in the world, but if you end up in a jam and don't know how to fix it, you can end up re-doing a whole project.

These are all reasons and more of why we are kindly suggesting you practice making smaller things that are "Boxes" that are screwed together and doors/drawer fronts need to line up with each other.

First and foremost, you need to make sure you know the standards of building kitchen cabinets.

The height width depth, etc are all very important.

Do you know the standards to kitchen cabinetry?

If so, please list them, as we're only trying to help you understand why we're concerned about you investing money into something that "Could" go wrong and we don't want to see you lose a lot of money.

Thanks!
 
  #9  
Old 12-17-04, 01:45 PM
Reen in Tacoma
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I too am just a beginner but if you want to make cabinets try some cabinets for your garage. I bought plans at the hardware store and they didn't come out to bad but I sure wouldn't want them in my kitchen. I could have bought cabinets cheaper but whats the fun in that.
The first project I tried was a toy box for my grandaughter. I bought expensive hardwood veneer plywood which is now just out of square pieces in the scrap wood pile. I found out the hard way that my square was way off.
 
  #10  
Old 12-17-04, 02:35 PM
Sawdustguy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Reen,

Amen to the square being way off.

I was making a solid wood kitchen table with tapered legs on all sides that connected with Mortise and Tennons and had to taper my mortise and tennon cuts to match the angles.

I sat there and racked my brain as to why when I flipped it around and backward to make the other side of my tennon; I realized that my square was off. I set my miter gauge to what I thought was the proper angle, but turned out it was really "Off"

Do you know how to make sure a square is square? I wrote a post about it and I can find it if you'd like the info.

This trade is all a learning experience and through experience/mistakes is what makes you better at this trade.
 
  #11  
Old 01-21-09, 01:23 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 17
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Amen to squareness!

You can actually do some fine adjustments on framing squares by hammering either the heel (to tighten) or the crook (to spread). Kinda like hammering out a rivet...
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: