Question on how to start/end Baseboard into stairway...

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  #1  
Old 01-19-05, 10:41 PM
rUfUnKy
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Question Question on how to start/end Baseboard into stairway...

I decided to replace my old boring baseboard with something a little nicer.
The problem is the new baseboard is taller then the stairway molding.

At first I just butted it up against the stairway but it looked rather unfinished. I then decide to use plinth blocks to separate the two different heights. Is this right?? Also does it look out of place?

Here are some picture.

http://img85.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img85&image=foyer0qb.jpg

http://img85.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img85...eboard27li.jpg


http://img85.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img85...seboard9ii.jpg
 
  #2  
Old 01-20-05, 06:08 AM
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hi
Well to my opinion, it's stick out like a sour thumb, sorry
I would used a table saw and rip the new molding to the right size. look like you have 6 in baseboard and the old are 4 1/2 inches.
Molding company make baseboard in various size.
I would remove those corner block and miter the angle at 45 degree or if you know how to do coping them used this method.

sorry for the negative feedback, but to make a good job , i would redo them. Looks more professional.

cheers

pgtek
 
  #3  
Old 01-20-05, 07:49 AM
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Molding

Unfortunately, I have to agree with pgtek. I think using mitres on the outside corners and coping the insides would look much cleaner. I also think that the different hieghts of the molding by the stairway sticks out a little too much. Ripping them down wouldn't be too difficult and would look a lot nicer.

That being said, I don't think they look terrible or anything. They look OK if you're not ready to redo it just yet. Take a while to get used to it. You will either grow to like it or grow to hate it. If you're unsure of how it looks yourself, you probably already have the answer.

Good luck and post some more pics if you change it. I'd be interested in seeing the difference.
 
  #4  
Old 01-20-05, 08:16 AM
rUfUnKy
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Thanks guys for your honest opinion (that's what I was asking for ; ) I think I'm going to keep the corner blocks because I don't have a miter saw.

The reason for changing the baseboard was because I like the taller style. Are you saying I should rip all the baseboard down to size? or just the ones that meet up with the stairway??

Thanks
 
  #5  
Old 01-20-05, 12:06 PM
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hi
yes rip them to the same size as the stairs

cheers

pg
 
  #6  
Old 01-20-05, 05:26 PM
rUfUnKy
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One more question. Should I still use the plinth blocks between the sairway molding and the new baseboard? Or is it not the right place to use something like that?? I know they usualy go under the doorway molding but I'm not sure if they are also used in other areas as well. Sorry for being such a newb .
 
  #7  
Old 01-21-05, 02:21 PM
rUfUnKy
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*BUMP* for my last question

"Should I still use the plinth blocks between the sairway molding and the new baseboard? Or is it not the right place to use something like that??"
 
  #8  
Old 01-21-05, 09:27 PM
rUfUnKy
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anyone?? not trying to be a pain, just that I would like to finish this project over the weakend ......
 
  #9  
Old 01-24-05, 08:51 AM
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hi
remove it and let the moulding but to the old one and used latex caulk to fill the crack

pg
 
  #10  
Old 01-24-05, 09:59 AM
rUfUnKy
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Thanks pgtek
 
  #11  
Old 01-24-05, 08:46 PM
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This suggestion may lead to... too much work, but just thought I would pass it along.

If you like the taller base, have you thought about also replacing the stair trim... to possibly better line up new base and old base?

I know it all depends on your specific situation, but I was faced with a similar situation a few years ago and the transition from new to old worked out better downstair than upstairs. The problem was... the new trim was installed upstairs... after finally talking myself into replacing the stair trim and transitioning downstairs, I was much happier.

Just a thought.
 
  #12  
Old 01-24-05, 10:25 PM
rUfUnKy
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HI DIY-Steve, Are you saying add more molding to the staircase trim to account for the difference instead of ripping the baseboard? I also thought about doing that. I think it would be a reasonable solution to keeping the taller baseboard.

Even if I just make the stairway higher then the base I think it will look better then it does now. That is how it was before, The base board was a good inch below the Stair molding.

I've yet to nail the pieces that I am unsure of There still sort of just sitting there .
 
  #13  
Old 01-25-05, 06:11 AM
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I was suggesting that you remove the old stair trim and then add some of the new.

Some of the other experts will probably explain this better.... but on one of the staircases that I trimmed out the upper floor lined up directly with the stair 2x10 stringers.... so it was easy to continue the new baseboard from one floor to another.

On another staircase, the top of the stair stringer was cut a few inches above the floor. So it ended about in the middle of the baseboard. The original installer, ripped off just the top of the base and installed it on top of the stringer....so the height of the base on the upper and lower floors lined up with the staircase baseboard. On this staircase it looked like the only way to install the baseboard so when I replaced the trim, I copied what the original installer did.

A picture would go a long way to explaining this... but this was in house I sold ~10 years ago.
 
  #14  
Old 01-25-05, 06:45 PM
rUfUnKy
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Thanks DIY-Steve

I'm pretty sure I get what your saying. I think that's a good idea. When I was thinking of building up the stairway I was concerned about finding molding that would match up with the new base. I didn't even think to buy extra base and rip it to size to use for the new molding .

I photochoped (real quick ) what it will look like when done in this manor.

http://img197.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img1...otoshop7fg.jpg
 
  #15  
Old 01-26-05, 05:53 AM
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It looks like you've got what I was talking about.

When I installed my baseboard in this manner, I was lucky, because the stair stringer ended at the top step so the joint wasn't as noticeable.
(it looks like yours comes a foot or so onto the landing, so your joint will be a little more prononced).

I think once you have it permanently installed, it'll be one of those areas that the average person will never notice... but, if you're like me, you'll probably point it out anyway.

Good Luck.
 
  #16  
Old 01-26-05, 06:38 PM
rUfUnKy
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Originally Posted by DIY-Steve
but, if you're like me, you'll probably point it out anyway.

LOL... Without a doubt ....
 
 

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