cabinet hinges--repair


  #1  
Old 02-15-05, 09:40 AM
dave519
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cabinet hinges--repair

The cabinets in my kitchen are circa late 80s. A laminated particle board. One of the hinges (which is countersunk) has pulled out of the side of the cabinet. Since the hinge is countersunk I am unable to move it around on the cabinet door. The hinge holes are stripped, so the screws will not hold the door. I have filled the holes with wood filler and will now attempt to reinstall the hinge screws. However, I don't have a good feeling about it. Is there another technique that might work better. The cabinet side rests against the side of the dishwasher, so there is no room for any kind of nut and bolt to hood the hinge in place. I think I have touse the old existing holes and need to figure out how to shore them up to hold the screws. Thoughts???
 
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Old 02-15-05, 10:11 AM
pgtek's Avatar
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hi
you have european hinges on your cabinet.
remove the wood filler from the hole.
next get some constuction adhesive and put some in the hinge hole.
not to much then place hinge back in the hole and used some clamps to press it down and let it set.
before fill the screw holes with wood glue.
then once it set secure the screws back in the glue fill hole.
should be ok
 
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Old 02-15-05, 09:14 PM
Sawdustguy
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Take toothpicks with yellow wood glue. Put as many as you can fit into the hole with glue. Let it dry for at least a few hours. Break off toothpicks and re-screw it in. You can also take a razor knife and shave off pieces of wood that are sharp and will look like toothpicks.
 
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Old 02-16-05, 05:15 PM
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Ive used the toothpick trick and it works, but I prefer to drill out the old screw holes with a 1/4" bit and glue in pieces of 1/4" dowel. This gives me a firm bit of solid wood for my screws.

I've been known to do this on a brand new cabinet if it's made of particle board or MDF. A little extra work now, but insurance for later on. -

Not long ago, I used 1/2" dowels to tighten up the hinges in a heavy front door with pine jambs. I drilled completely thru the jamb and into the stud then glued in 2" pieces of dowel and used 1-1/2" screws for the hinges. That sucker ain't EVER coming loose.
 
 

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