Restoring "Pet" Scratched Doors & Trim

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  #1  
Old 03-18-05, 12:06 PM
patrickhenryhart
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Restoring "Pet" Scratched Doors & Trim

I'm currently involved in a project which will require repairing/restoration of the bottom glass door rail & some stiles (Clear finished Pine & Birch) as well as some of the jamb trim which have suffered considerable damage from dog scratches due to some previous owner.

Does anyone have any experience/solutions in restoring such damaged items for a competed acceptable finish, preferably other than completely sanding the whole side of the door and thus complete refinishing?
 
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Old 03-18-05, 03:33 PM
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If the scratches are too deep, it may be better just to replace them.

If not, since it's nothing but a clear coated wood, you should be able to sand the scratches out, and simply recoat with polyurethane (probably what was used originally). That's pretty easy. When your trying to do the same thing with a stained wood, it gets more difficult.
 
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Old 03-18-05, 03:54 PM
K
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Having recently spent many hours patching/sanding/patching/sanding/patching/sanding several doors and trim in my kitchen, my best advice is to replace the woodwork. If your trim has any detail work, grooves or other character, getting a good finish is darn near impossible. I could kill the former owners who locked their large dogs in the kitchen during the day--if it were my dogs I would have crated them long before they damaged the walls/windows and doors as badly as they did.

Good Luck!
 
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Old 03-20-05, 05:18 PM
patrickhenryhart
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Thank you both for your responses, Herm & Kimeyers, however, "replacement" is really not in the question for this customer.

They are deep scratches for the most part, however, I suppose it may be possible to fill, sand and try to match the patina.

The trim is an older (early 50's) full 2-1/2" width which would probably require me locating, then purchasing molding bits for that profile, which for one or two pieces, would be outlandish.

As for the "French Glass Sliding Doors (3)" separating the living room from a Sun/Plant room, that is definitely out of the question.

Hopefully, someone else may come along with a solution.
 
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Old 03-20-05, 06:00 PM
C
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Check with the local molding shop.
They may already have the knives
 
  #6  
Old 03-20-05, 06:15 PM
patrickhenryhart
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Originally Posted by chfite
Check with the local molding shop.
They may already have the knives
Possible, but living in a sparsley populated area, I only know of one (1) casework and molder company within over 100 miles (at only 15). About 13 years ago, I had to purchase knives for another job for this customer, but I had several feet to use. All birch trim, as with most of this present job.
 
  #7  
Old 03-20-05, 08:38 PM
Sawdustguy
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Have yo thought about taking a hot iron with a damp/wet rag over the scratched area and steamed them out?

There is a company in Chicagoland near me that i just had them duplicate a 3.5" wide casing. The knife to be made cost me about $100.00 which is a heck of a lot cheaper than most companies. It's called Star Molding. I can get their number if you'd like. You'd just send them a small sample and they'll do it. You can also trace the profile on a blank piece of paper and tell them what you want it made out of and how much and they'll duplicate it.

Average knife cutting for duplication is between $300.00 and $500.00.

Yes, they do keep the knives, but all you'd end up paying is a set up charge if you need more. Don't tell them right away that you need it duplicated, or they will tell you that is the only option. Just say you were recommended to them from a fellow cabinetmaker friend of yours and that you guys did a nice job and had tons of profiles.

Worst case senerio would be that you'd have them make a few extra sticks to replace the whole area
 
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Old 03-20-05, 08:59 PM
patrickhenryhart
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Originally Posted by Sawdustguy
Have yo thought about taking a hot iron with a damp/wet rag over the scratched area and steamed them out?

There is a company in Chicagoland near me that i just had them duplicate a 3.5" wide casing. The knife to be made cost me about $100.00 which is a heck of a lot cheaper than most companies. It's called Star Molding. I can get their number if you'd like. You'd just send them a small sample and they'll do it. You can also trace the profile on a blank piece of paper and tell them what you want it made out of and how much and they'll duplicate it.
Thanks! I think the damage is beyond your 1st method, too deep. However, possibly your second solution and contact number! But I will need to talk to my clients 1st. I think I can still get the knives for my Foley-Belsaw cheaper than that. It's just the durn set-up for a limited run.
 
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Old 03-20-05, 09:07 PM
Sawdustguy
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Being self-employed myself, it's not always about hitting a home run on every job, rather, you've made the "Impossible", reasonable $$ for them and who knows what other work it will lead it.

I almost threw the sales guy out of my shop because I hate people that don't call first. Then when I heard a bit more of what he said, he was the answer I have been looking for. I believe it's called Star Molding and Trim in Bedford Park, IL.

I'll have to get back to you on it. I've been off of work the past few days because of Major Sinus Surgery and I'm still down under.
 
 

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