baseboards + odd angles

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Old 04-09-05, 12:28 PM
pcourterelle's Avatar
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baseboards + odd angles

Hi folks, tried searching for a similar thread but did not come across one...I'm sure this question has been asked before..

Installing baseboards around a Bay Window. Some of the angles are odd, 48* outside, *44 inside ect. Up to now I've been using the old standby, fiddle & fit technique, using the measured angle as a starting point and then fiddling until both pieces fit. While this works it consumes time and material. Is there a better way? Any suggestions welcome.

cheers
pc
 
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Old 04-09-05, 12:54 PM
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Wink

When you check the angle and cut half of it on each side dont it fit. Like when you have a 90o angle you cut both sides at a 45o. If I have right ??

ED
 
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Old 04-09-05, 01:17 PM
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Yes, the angle is always off by a bit. Granted it could be the difference between the bevel guage and the saw's measurement.

Inside corners seem to be the most finicky

pc
 
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Old 04-09-05, 01:47 PM
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If you cope the inside corners, it will be the easy part.
 
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Old 04-09-05, 01:49 PM
J
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Buy a cheap angle finder. measure the angle and divide by 2
 
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Old 04-09-05, 02:18 PM
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lol...

Yes coping works fine one 90* or near 90* corners. It's the technique I use for all those types of corners. Butt end one side and cope the other. Works great.

But you cannot cope a 44* angle, like around a bay window.

I have an angle finder (bevel gauge with angle reader built in). Still the angle is not always true. Still lots of fiddling. The angle finder brings it in the ballpark but there's still lots of room for error between left field and home plate, so to speak.

pc
 
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Old 04-09-05, 02:46 PM
J
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I'm thinking about getting one of these. It takes all the geuss work out of it for a reasonable price.

http://www.qvc.com/asp/frameset.asp?...ss=&Submit4=Go

I think these are both the same ?????
 
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Old 04-09-05, 05:59 PM
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Originally Posted by pcourterelle
lol...

But you cannot cope a 44* angle, like around a bay window.

Maybe you haven't tried hard enough. Coping an odd angle is just like coping a square angle, it's just not as easy.

When you cope a normal 90 degree corner, one piece has a square cut on the end, the other is cut and coped at a 45. Then when you cope it, you hold the saw at a 90 degree angle, since that is the angle of the piece that fits into it. (actually, you back cut it a few degrees so that the face will fit tight.)

Coping an odd angle is no different. Let's say it's a 45 degree angle. One side would be cut at a 45 degree angle. The coped side would first be cut at half the angle of the first. (22.5) When you cope it, you don't hold the saw at a 90... because the other piece of base isn't coming into it at a 90- it's coming into it at a 45. So that's the way you cope it. (perpendicular to the face of your 22.5 degree miter, or maybe just a little beyond, if you want it back cut a little bit.)

I like to cut the miter (in this case, 22.5) flip it upside down then square off the face of the miter to find out where the back of my cut needs to come to. Then square that line off, and you can visually see where the cope needs to extend to. (this line will represent the long point of the piece of base with the 45.)

Then I can visually ensure that if I remove the line, I've backcut the joint just right.
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 04-09-05 at 06:42 PM.
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Old 04-13-05, 08:06 AM
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I agree with xsleeper. Cope around the bay windows. I just did this yesterday.

One trick to find the exact angle, it to simply cut a piece of scrap, say a 1x2 x8" long or 1x3, cut it at a guess estimate (say 25 degrees). Place the two matched cuts to the corner, check the fit, you will be off a few degrees, then estimate the the adjustment needed (say 24 degrees) , re-cut and fit, and so on, till it is perfect angle fit. And that will be your precise angle. Just takes a minute to do. And the best part is that your mitre saw will now be set exactly where you need it for the finish cut.

If you use a angle finder tool, then set your mitre saw to that angle, you will find that you will be off a fraction of a degree.

Generally with trim work, you would not want to use any method that can introduce errors, such as reading a number on one angle finding tool, then setting the saw to that same number on the mitre saw gauge.
 
 

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