What kind of wood to use for cabinets?

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Old 08-10-05, 08:34 PM
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What kind of wood to use for cabinets?

Okay, I'm branching out my other post.

My hubby and I like the "country" look in a kitchen. My decor is going to be Americana stuff. I don't like dark wood colors (like cherry wood) or even colors too light (like white and tan colored woods). Any suggestions? Do I have to stain them? I'm assuming yes but I've never done anything like this. I also have an island that was made by the seller. The kitchen counters use to be L-shaped, but he cut off one side to open up the eat-in kitchen, and made it an island. The couter top of just the island is made of the ceramic tile that is on our kitchen floor. The rest of the countertops are brand new regular countertop (the not ugly kind but not beautiful or anything... LoL).

Thanks for all the pending replies!!!
 
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Old 08-11-05, 07:01 AM
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Hi
for the cabinet used knotty pine and stain them honey pine or honey maple
there light color and then apply 2 coat of satin poly over them
as for the counter install ceramic tile cheapper and does make the country style.

been there done that
 
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Old 08-11-05, 04:54 PM
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Most hardware stores have a small color display with actual wood samples coated with various stains so you can see the actually color on both pine samples and oak samples.
 
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Old 08-11-05, 06:12 PM
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Just my $.02, maybe I can offer some helpful hints.

I'm partial to *natural*, meaning, unstained wood. It's much easier to do (sand and clearcote, no waiting for stain to dry), no blotching of the wood, no stain on your hands, less stuff to buy, etc.... I could go on and on. But most importantly, unstained wood is a breeze to touch up--- any scrape or cut in the wood will result in, well, wood the same color as the rest. A wood that is stained will have a very, very obvious mark in it. I made a birch box for my wife's beading crafts and stained with with a lovely Sedona Red stain. Looks nice (other than some blotches), but there's a spot on a corner where she gored it on something, and there's this white spot on the corner amidst the deep red of the box. I know, a lil stain will take care of it, but it's still a pain. Natural color would have been a non-issue.



Anyhow, good "not too white not too dark" woods to try would be (in no particular order):

knotty pine (it will yellow over time, definitely country)

red or white oak

hickory (I personally like this wood)

spanish cedar (hard to find at places other than specialty hardwood suppliers, and costly)

fir

mahogany (it's only dark in furniture b/c it's stained, otherwise it's a gorgeous bronze color)
 
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Old 08-11-05, 07:44 PM
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Hmmm lots more to think about now. It sounds like oak is more our bag. Don't like things that "yellow." Just not my personal style.

So your suggestion, Mr. mako, is to buy wood, cut it to style and size, and hang it up? LoL I LOVE THAT IDEA!

Will definitly try to find that "perfect" wood for our cabinets, but will check out the aisle with the different pieces stained as well. If we can't find wood the color we want, then staining it is.

Thanks so much gang!
PottersDaughter
 
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Old 08-13-05, 09:46 AM
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Note that your choice of finish will also possibly yellow a lot, maybe moreso than the wood itself. Regular old nitrocellulose lacquer, like Deft, will yellow over time, and so will polyurethane. The least yellowing product I know of is conversion varnish, but it's mostly only available to professionals b/c it's very toxic stuff. If you know anyone that has a spray booth (either for cabinetry or automotive) you can spray conversion varnish there. Oddly, it's not necessarily much more expensive than poly or deft lacquer. It's also 100% more chemical and wear resistant. You'll find it at paint specialty stores, I prefer satin. Be sure to ask for non-yellowing, there are a few types that are (if the liquid in the can is the color of honey, you will know!).
 
 

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