Wood type for new internal windowsill

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Old 02-09-07, 04:48 AM
J
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Wood type for new internal windowsill

Hi,

I'm replacing a window sill in the house (not damaged, just need wider one cause of drylining the room). The old one is natural wood finish. I was wondering what's the usual type of wood to use when replacing an internal windowsill? Would varnished white deal do? The old sill doesn't look like white deal. Would it be hard enough?

thanks,
J
 
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Old 02-09-07, 04:07 PM
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I've never heard of "white deal."

It depends on what species of wood you currently have since if you have a clear finish on the wood, you can evidentally see the wood grain, which is what you would want to match.

If you can snap a digital pic, then upload it to a file sharing web site like photobucket or yahoo, we could take a look. It's hard to advise sight unseen.
 
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Old 02-09-07, 05:31 PM
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A century and more ago the word "deal" in this context refered to the common softwoods, typically pine.
 
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Old 02-09-07, 06:32 PM
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Thanks Jan2! Learned something new today. I've never heard of such a thing!

In that case, I would just guess that what you have is what's in most old houses- old growth Douglas fir, SPF or yellow pine, which is probably anywhere from 7/8" to 5/4" thick. Today's white pine will probably not match very well (different grain and takes stain and finish differently), but I've seen some painters who really know their stuff who get it to look pretty good.

However with a natural finish, my guess is that you'll have better luck if you can locate some hemlock, which has a more similar grain and takes on a much deeper "wet look" when finished as compared to "white pine" which doesn't seem to be as consistantly absorbant.

Douglas Fir would be a good second choice. It also matches old trim quite well. Our local Lowe's stores carry that in 1x6 S4S dimensions.
 
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Old 02-10-07, 04:01 AM
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I am jumping in just as a curious bystander, but I don't recommend a varnished, or otherwise non painted "sill". Now since you mentioned redoing the interior, could you be talking about the stool and apron? These are the interior components related to the sill, which is on the outside. Just want clarification.
 
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Old 02-10-07, 05:52 AM
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I've found that a LOT of people have no idea what a "stool" is, and when they say "window sill", they actually mean stool. I've given up trying to correct them all. But I assumed that is what J was referring to.
 
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Old 02-10-07, 11:59 AM
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Thumbs up I believe there is a mix up in terminology is because J lives in Europe.

England as far as I can "tell".
 
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Old 02-10-07, 02:32 PM
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Hi, yes in Europe. In Ireland to be precice. White Deal here is just general common soft white wood like pine, as Jan2 pointed out. Maybe we're a little backwards here ;-) And yes, it's the inside sill, or the stool. Never knew that, thanks Chandler.

I bought a pine stool there today, but I'm unsure on wheather to use it or not. What would it look like stained? Does it take a stain well? The old stool I'm replacing seems to be a harder wood, and is a darker wood. I'm kind of thinking that the stool should be fairly hard waring.

thanks for your help,
J
 
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Old 02-11-07, 11:04 AM
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J, roger that. OK, If the grain is tight in the other stools, I would opt for oak or another harder wood. If there is a distinct wide grain, then it would probably be pine, poplar or spruce.
 
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