Crown Molding

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Old 02-28-07, 08:54 AM
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Crown Molding

My plan is to install a 3 piece cornice made up of a 1/2X3 baseboard piece on both the ceiling and walls around a 5/8X4-1/4 dental crown. I have previously installed crown and always used nail blocks or a continuous nailer to firmly attach the top of the crown on the walls where the ceiling joists run palallel to the walls . My question is how to best add the this additional piece to the ceiling? How do you firmly attach the baseboard trim piece to the ceiling on the walls where the ceiling joists run palallel to the walls?
Thanks - Ned
 
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Old 02-28-07, 10:23 AM
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Welcome to the forums Ned

Since there isn't anything to nail to on 2 of the ceilings you might want to use adhesive and some nails [criss crossed at an angle] to hold it in place while the adhesive dries.
 
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Old 02-28-07, 02:57 PM
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What he said. Plus, you will have a sheetrock nailer along the edge, so make sure you put one of your nails there. The adhesive will hold fine. There is a restaurant here in town that has what you are describing, and that is how it was installed.
 
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Old 03-03-07, 04:36 AM
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crown molding

Larry & Marksr,
thanks for the reply. I have 3 follow-up ?'s. 1. about how far apart should I nail? - every 16 in? and 2. I am working with MDF mouldings for the first time, can you tell me how long it needs to equlibrate in the room before I start cutting and 3. I got a pneumatic nailer a while back, this is my first cornice job. Any special tips?
Thanks - Ned
 
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Old 03-03-07, 12:47 PM
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First, I have one additional tip.

When drywall is taped, the inside corners are usually built out with mud by at least 1/8" on both the ceiling and wall. If you stick a framing square in the corner, you'll see what I mean. This presents a problem for your type of crown installation. The baseboard you install against the ceiling will sit at a bit of an angle. To alleviate that, I'd suggest that you run the baseboard through a table saw, and cut about a 2 degree angle off the back side, which will help the baseboard lay a little more square. The benefit of that is that you will be fitting your dentil moulding into a corner that is more square and you won't have an unsightly gap above and below it.

As for the other questions, You'll hit the studs in the wall every 16" and also into the ceiling where possible. As for nailing into the drywall, I've never had much sucess with that. Personally, I'd glue it to the ceiling, and just tack it enough in back to hold it up there. When you put the dentil moulding on, it will hold the baseboard up to the ceiling tight.

I'd let the MDF acclimate for 72 hours. Maybe Chandler has a different opinion.

The only tip I have for the nailer is to first use a studfinder to mark all the studs before you even start. I often mark them with a piece of blue painters' tape, rather than writing on a wall that I don't want to touch up. I've seen some guys who use a finish gun like a stud finder, and you'll see 5 nails all in a row where they were searching for something to nail to. Idiots. So what I'm trying to say is don't riddle your trim with nails, even though it's fun to use you don't want any more nails in the trim than are necessary. When you have to fill your own nail holes you become conscious of that fact.
 
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Old 03-03-07, 02:57 PM
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Yes, acclimating the MDF to the atmosphere it will live in for about 72 hours (like hardwood flooring) is imperative. You may want to use something like Powergrab for the ceiling part where there will be no wood to attach it.
 
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Old 03-03-07, 04:38 PM
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One other thing I thought of... the installation of this style of trim is similar to something I did recently, which some architect dreamed up. Here's a photo of it, partially completed: http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/thexsleeper/detail?.dir=4b29&.dnm=b209re2.jpg

This is where I ran into the problem of the built up drywall mud in the corners not allowing the pieces to fit tight to the wall/ceiling. So I came up with the idea of shaving a few degrees off the back side.

But the thought I wanted to add was that I ended up gluing and nailing the top two pieces together before I installed them- it made them one unit and created a tighter seam where the two meet. So perhaps that is something you could consider with the ceiling baseboard and the dentil moulding perhaps. It makes nailing the ceiling piece less of an issue because after you nail them together you just need to glue the top and nail the whole thing to the wall. Of course, if it's getting painted, any gaps can get caulked. The trim I was working with was getting stained, and a gap was not something I wanted to see.
 
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