making laminate counter tops

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Old 03-09-07, 04:34 PM
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making laminate counter tops

I am going to make a 28 inch deep counter in my office using laminate. I have never done this before. I have a router and all necessary tools to do it.

I would like to fine a book to give me some tips that I need, such as router bit, etc. I have not been able to fine anything in the stores such as Lowes and Home Depot.

Can anyone direct me to the right location or give me any tips that I may need.

Thanks,

Harlan.
 
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Old 03-09-07, 05:37 PM
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There's probably not a book on the subject because the topic would probably only fill a few pages.

Laminating is fairly simple, so if you have any questions, I'm sure we can answer them for you here. One recent post on the subject can be found at: http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=292316

Generally you want a piloted flush trim bit (carbide), and possibly a piloted chamfered bit. A router is a little large and unwieldy to use on laminate, but it will work.
 
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Old 03-10-07, 02:06 AM
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Thanks for the link...I think I should have the information that I need. The big question was the type of router bit.

Harlan.
 
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Old 03-10-07, 08:07 AM
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I personally would not use a router on laminate. Too harsh a tool. I would either use a jig saw with a fine blade or a zip saw. We use them for laminate almost every day. Good Luck
 
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Old 03-10-07, 08:24 PM
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A flush trim bit with a pilot bearing is definitely the way to go in my book. Easier with a laminate trimmer rather than a full sized router. I've done quite a few of them. Cut your laminate slightly oversized and trim with the bit after adhering to your substrate. After trimming, I usually take a piece of fine sand paper and a sanding block to clean up the edge or "burnish" it, sanding the corner of the edge only on a slight bevel.
 
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Old 03-11-07, 05:21 AM
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Thanks for your help
 
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Old 03-31-07, 04:47 AM
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another question

I thought I read some where that you should install a wood strip on the edge of the substrate and then apply the laminate to that instead of directly to the edge of the raw edges of the substrate.

Just wondering if that is the way to go?

Harlan
 
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Old 03-31-07, 09:55 AM
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I always laminate directly onto edges. Double glue all edges of the particle board and, if you did not already know, laminate producers recommend high density particle board, never plywood. Make sure to roll firmly and let it dry a bit before trimming (less glue build up on the trimmer). Trim with a straight or chamfered router bit with a bearing. The larger the bearing the better. Soak the bearing in lacqer thinner from time to time to prevent it from loading up with cement. finishing the edge with fine sandpaper is a good idea. I use a very fine mill file and get good results.
 
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