creating door frame

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Old 03-12-07, 06:18 AM
J
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creating door frame

Hi,

just wondering if anybody had any information on creating a new door frame, with the skirting board, and wood that the door hinge connects into? I don't know what it's all exactly called. Is there any websites out there at all?

thanks,
J
 
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Old 03-12-07, 07:30 AM
W
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Door "frame"

The part of the door frame that fits inside the opening is called the jamb. There are jamb kits available at the big box stores for building the jamb. You will have to cut in the mortises for recessing the hinges. You can rip plain boards to make your jambs also.

The trim which joins the edge of the jamb to the wall and hides the space between the jamb and the framing is called the casing. Casing is also available at big box stores in various patterns. Make sure the pattern you get matches what you already have.

The easiest solution is to install a prehung door. For interior doors, the door, jamb, and casing are furnished as a single unit. For exterior doors, the inside casing is purchased separately to match what you already have.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 03-12-07, 04:23 PM
C
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Some other terms not yet mentioned.

The molding that stops the door from swinging all the way through is called "stop".

An exterior door also has a "threshold" and can be configured a number of ways. An exterior door should also have some sort of weatherstripping.

The recessed area where the latch plate is attached is called the latch mortise.

A door has a minimum of a pair of hinges. Door people call three hinges "a pair and a half".

The small space where the casing is set back from the jamb is called "reveal". The term is used elsewhere when refering to trim carpentry features.

Decorative casing is usually "mitered" where they intersect. Plain trim (1X material - also sometimes called S4S (for smooth four sides)) is more often butted together.
 
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Old 03-13-07, 05:36 AM
J
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thanks for all this.

Was wondering, Do you run drywall right up to the jam, behind the casing? Or do you run it up to the side of the casing?


thanks again,
J
 
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Old 03-13-07, 06:21 AM
W
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Drywall

The jamb must be wide enough to extend flush to the outer face of the drywall. Then the casing lays flat on the edge of the jamb and the face of the drywall.

A jamb for a 2x4 framed wall covered with 1/2 inch drywall on both sides is usually 4 5/8 in. wide.
 
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