edge to edge glueing

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-10-07, 07:20 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Kenosha, WI
Posts: 60
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
edge to edge glueing

Hello all,
I have a plan that calls for 3 1" x 6" x 36" hard maple boards to be glued together edge to edge for a piece that measures 18" wide. I've never done this, so...

1) Do they make hard maple boards that are 1" x 18" x 36", b/c that would be the simplest solution. The widest I've seen them at HD or Lowes seems to be 12".

2) If no to the above, how to I glue them together and maintain a flat board?

Jeremy
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-10-07, 09:15 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,550
Received 301 Votes on 267 Posts
I like to use a biscuit joiner when glueing pieces together. Sand when dry.
 
  #3  
Old 04-10-07, 09:21 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Kenosha, WI
Posts: 60
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Do I need to use a biscuit joiner? I don't have one.
 
  #4  
Old 04-10-07, 09:32 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,550
Received 301 Votes on 267 Posts
You can't use biscuits without a biscuit joiner to cut the groove. I have seen kits for converting 4" grinders into a biscuit cutter.

You will need to use clamps to hold the glued boards together so it is possible to glue them up without biscuits [biscuits just make it easier/stronger] Working on a level surface and possibly using shims [between the wood and clamp]to keep the boards level should work ok.
 
  #5  
Old 04-10-07, 09:34 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Yorktown, VA
Posts: 322
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
jeremy1701,

No, you don't absolutely have to have bisquits. They are very helpful in keeping the surfaces of the boards even during glue-up. You can align them without bisquits however. Just clamp them up, keepng the clamps just loose enough to adjust the surfaces up and re-tighten the clamps. Clamping a straight edge of some sort across the glued up panel helps, but you have to make sure you don't make it permanent with too much glue squeeze out.

Another thing that you need to watch out for is that the edges mate without gaps with little or no clamp pressure. This may be difficult unless you find some very straight boards or you have a jointer. If you pull a gap together with the clamps, the joint is likely to fail at some time in the future.

One more thing....as marksr says, the end result after the glue-up will certainly require some sanding or scraping to finish it up. This is quite normal.
 
  #6  
Old 04-10-07, 10:10 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Kenosha, WI
Posts: 60
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the tips!

I've been reading about using a router and table as a make-shift biscuit joiner. Would this better or worse then simply gluing them?
 
  #7  
Old 04-10-07, 10:17 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Yorktown, VA
Posts: 322
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
jeremy1701,

I think that for one glue-up 36" long, I would just glue them up without bisquits. You would probably have to buy a router bit and biscuits. Not sure it's worth it for one job.

By the way, start with boards longer than 36". You'll have to trim the panel to finished dimensions after the glue dries.

Good luck,
 
  #8  
Old 04-10-07, 12:01 PM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,706
Received 17 Votes on 16 Posts
Boards

Be aware that a 1x6 is only 5 1/2 inches wide. Three will not give you 18 inches of width.
 
  #9  
Old 04-10-07, 03:34 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
In addition, reverse your end grains on every other board to prevent warping later on. Maple is a very hard and lightly porous wood, and you may have to use something like Titebond III to get a good glue up. Polyurethane glue is another alternative if you don't use biscuits. It will ooze more than regular glue, but that is the nature of the beast, since it expands. I still vote for the biscuit jointer. It may be possible to rent one. Maple ain't cheap, and you obviously are making something you want to keep.
 
  #10  
Old 04-11-07, 06:17 AM
W
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,188
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You don't say what you are building, but if strength is important, you could go "old school" and use dowels.
 
  #11  
Old 04-11-07, 06:51 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,550
Received 301 Votes on 267 Posts
Originally Posted by Wayne Mitchell View Post
you could go "old school" and use dowels.

GOOD POINT!!!!

How soon we forget how it used to be done all you need is a dowel rod and the right size drill bit.
 
  #12  
Old 04-11-07, 06:57 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 25,853
Received 644 Votes on 596 Posts
The suggestions already given would probably work, with varying degrees of quality, but a really nice way to join boards so that they will be flush with one another is to use a router and a glue joint router bit. (example: http://www.amanatool.com/bitdetails/55388.jpg)

Of course, this is assuming you have a router table and the money to blow on an additional bit!
 
  #13  
Old 04-11-07, 09:21 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
Eeew, I like that. Wonder if it comes in 1/4" shank.
 
  #14  
Old 04-11-07, 09:41 AM
W
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,188
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
"Wonder if it comes in 1/4" shank."

Got a grinder?
 
  #15  
Old 04-11-07, 10:29 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 25,853
Received 644 Votes on 596 Posts
I've never seen a glue joint bit with a 1/4" shank. Even all the cheap-o's on ebay are all 1/2" shanks. Surely you could get a 1/2" collet for your router!

The grinder seems a bit extreme... maybe you could weld a 1/4" shank onto the 1/2" one. LOL

But in addition to the above, you might have less cupping of the boards if you joined smaller dimension lumber... lots of 1x2's or 1x4's instead of just 3 1x6's. It's a lot more joining and glueing, but the end result might be better. Maybe for a beginner, joining three 1x6's is enough of a challenge!
 
  #16  
Old 04-11-07, 10:35 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,550
Received 301 Votes on 267 Posts
I'd pass on the grinder or the welder, router bits turn to fast!!

If you can't get a 1/2" collet for your router you probably can find a reason to buy a bigger one that will
 
  #17  
Old 04-11-07, 10:41 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 25,853
Received 644 Votes on 596 Posts
LOL, good point, marksr! And then you'd need a whole new set of 1/2" shank bits to go with it!

Just to clarify... I *was* joking about the welding comment... don't want to get banned for advocating unsafe practices or anything...
 
  #18  
Old 04-11-07, 10:52 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Kenosha, WI
Posts: 60
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for all your help!
 
  #19  
Old 04-11-07, 12:39 PM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,706
Received 17 Votes on 16 Posts
Joints

Consider using 1/4 inch plywood splines. Cut the grooves with your table saw.
 
  #20  
Old 04-11-07, 06:57 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
I've done the spline thing on sand boxes. Didn't think of that, but another good idea!
 
  #21  
Old 04-12-07, 09:28 PM
Herm's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Island Lake, IL
Posts: 535
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Jeremy1701 didn't say what the board was for, but a spline would show on the end grain of the boards, unless you do a "breadboard" edge. Bisquits would not. I've been edge glueing hard rock maple - soft maple, and many other hard woods for years, and have never used either for a size like that. Clamping is the key. I make sure the edges are close when clamping, and use a deadblow mallet, or hammer and sacraficial board to do the "fine adjustments". It will need to be sanded after anyway.

As Chandler said, alternate grains to compromise for warpage .

You will normally need to have enough wood to make a piece that's both wider and longer than your intended finished piece. After gluing, you'll have to cut it to size. It helps to acheive a perfectly square piece, with smooth edges.
 
  #22  
Old 04-13-07, 06:01 AM
W
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,188
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Herm - Splines don't have to show if you cut a blind groove in the piece.
 
  #23  
Old 04-13-07, 07:01 AM
AxlMyk's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Earth
Posts: 889
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
MLCS has all the bits you could possibly want.. Highest quality
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com
 
  #24  
Old 04-13-07, 07:58 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 25,853
Received 644 Votes on 596 Posts
I'll be darned, Chandler! There is a 1/4" glue joint bit!
 
  #25  
Old 04-13-07, 02:29 PM
R
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 230
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Just felt I had to weight in on this. From your post its seems you may not have a router yet. If you decide to use the router method (biscuits or routed edges will both work) look for a router that has interchangeable collets. My router can easily change collet sizes from 1/4" to 1/2" and it came with three different housings - all for under $200. I use it for a lot of different tasks and if you intend to do a lot of hands-on stuff it is a great addition to your shop.
 
  #26  
Old 04-15-07, 08:00 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
Another "must have". I'll let you know how I like it.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: