crown molding

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Old 04-18-07, 02:06 PM
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crown molding

I want to make a frame for a mirror using crown molding, but don't know how to figure what angle to cut. Are their any guides or samples I might look at.

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Old 04-18-07, 03:59 PM
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Is it a square or rectangular mirror? If so the cuts are 90* just like a regular frame.
The trick with crown molding (for us non pros) is to buy some cheap stuff to practice on before cutting the quality wood.
 
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Old 04-18-07, 04:05 PM
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I think Wayne means 45 degrees.

If I understand your question correctly, the answer depends how you will be building the picture frame, and also what tool you are using to cut the crown moulding. I assume you want the crown moulding to come out toward you, making it almost 3-D. If you want it flat against the wall, I assume there would not be any question about the angle!

There are 2 ways to cut crown moulding- "on the flat" and "in position". To cut crown moulding on the flat, you need a compound miter saw. To cut it in position, you need to have a fence or miter box that is tall enough to stand the crown moulding up (as it would be positioned if it were nailed up on the wall.) Both methods produce the same result but use different angles, depending on the spring angle of the crown moulding being used.

You also need to decide which side will be next to the picture- the fat edge of the crown or the skinny side of the crown.

It's easiest to cut cown moulding "in position" because then it is simply a matter of cutting a 45. And you have to keep in mind that normally you position the crown moulding upside down when you cut it (narrow edge up). One flat edge is against the fence while the other flat edge is against the table. Cutting it in this position would result in the fat edge of the crown being next to the picture. If you want it the other way around, you would flip the crown upside down and cut it with the fat edge up, which is the opposite of the way it is normally cut when putting it against a ceiling. This would result in a picture frame where the narrow edge is next to the picture and the fat edge is on the perimeter, coming out toward you.

So using that technique, you decide which side faces up, put it against the fence (in position) and cut a 45 left on the right side and a 45 right on the left side. The side facing down would end up being shorter then the side facing up. You'd do that 4 times to make a picture frame.

Sorry if this sounds complicated, but until you've worked with crown moulding a lot, it's kind of hard to understand, and even harder to explain.
 
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Old 04-19-07, 01:15 PM
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crown moulding

I believe I understand what you are saying. I have a compound miter saw so it appears I can do it two ways, flat or in position. The crown moulding I am using is the same on both sides, which should make it a little easier to cut.

I think I will cut it in position so I don't have to worry about more than one angle. If I understand using this method I do not have to be concerned with the spring angle, just cut a 45?

Good idea from Wayne to buy some cheap stuff to practice. This will be my first attempt at cutting crown moulding.

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Old 04-19-07, 01:24 PM
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You may be able to purchase a set of crown stops for your saw. They run about $30 and I use mine constantly.
 
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Old 04-19-07, 02:58 PM
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When you place the crown in position, all you have to worry about is cutting a 45, so yes, I think that is simpler than cutting it on the flat which would involve changing the bevel with confusing angles and fractions.

As Rockpro says, crown stops are nice to have if you do a lot of crown. But you can probably get by making a pencil line on your table and fence to ensure that you are always holding the crown in the same position each time, and not rolling it up or down slightly. This will ensure that all your 45s will match, otherwise you're creating a slightly different bevel each time, and they won't meet perfectly. Crown stops take away this margin for error by holding them consistantly at the right angle. (provided you set them properly!)

Just to be sure you have 45 degree spring angle crown, make sure that the pencil lines you make are both the same distance away from the corner of the fence/table. If one is longer than the other or the profile is not a mirror image of itself, then you have to pay attention to which side you have facing up EVERY time you make a cut.

Regardless of whether crown has a fat side or a skinny side, crown usually is not symetrical- it has a larger ogee on the bottom half when compared with the top half (as you look up at it on the ceiling). It almost sounds like you have a cove moulding, not crown.
 
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