Finishing Maple Cabinets

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-19-07, 12:27 PM
Q
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Finishing Maple Cabinets

I have 65 doors and 20 drawer fronts and also the cabinet shells and faces that are all Maple. They are about 5 years old and have no finish except thin sanding sealer which is very porous. I have read that sanding sealer is to be used with varnish or shellac only.
What is the process I need to follow to clean and finish (not stain) these cabinets? What is the speediest and best method to apply that process since there are so many?
Thanks!!!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-19-07, 04:08 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Wilmington
Posts: 4,219
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Not sure what condition 5 yr old sanding sealer might be in. But I would sand things smooth w/about #220, then apply a thinned coat or two of poly. Sand lightly after each coat. Then a couple of final coats. Oil based will be yellow or amber, which some like. Water based will be clear. I don't recommend shellac for anything in the kitchen, not a durable finish(only lasts a few hundred years on antiques, if no contact with water or alcohol), not even sure you can still buy varnish.
 
  #3  
Old 07-19-07, 04:16 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,563
Received 94 Votes on 83 Posts
Are you looking to change the color or just apply protective coatings?
 
  #4  
Old 07-20-07, 04:31 AM
Q
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Refinish Maple Cabinets

Hey Bill, what about the comment I read that says Poly doesn't work over sanding sealer? It is on this website under Furniture Finishing 9 - most common errors.

"Warning: Sanding sealer is not meant to be used below any polyurethane finish. Polyurethane finishes will not adhere to most sanding sealer and the polyurethane will peel off.

Tip: Do not use sanding sealer before using a polyurethane finish. The polyurethane will not adhere to the sealer and will peel off."

Minwax said I could use Polycrylic after sanding the sealer to rough it up. it is rather slick on the surface. Obviously, I don't know much about this product.

Mitch, I don't want to stain, just protect from further water damage.

I'm looking for a process of all the steps I need to use and also the fastest and easiest method, including tools, to apply those steps. I do have a large number to do amd I'm not a young chick.

Thanks for your help.
 
  #5  
Old 07-20-07, 04:45 AM
George's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Hill, Va. USA
Posts: 2,890
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Benjamin Moore makes a sanding sealer specifically for use prior to applying their polyurethane.

The caution against standing sealer under poly used to be universal; with the advent of new techniques in the industry it varies from brand to brand.
 
  #6  
Old 07-20-07, 10:46 AM
Q
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi George

Sanding Sealer was applied by the manufacturer of the cabinets 5 years ago. I have no way of knowing what it really is.
 
  #7  
Old 07-20-07, 11:10 AM
George's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Hill, Va. USA
Posts: 2,890
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The only admonition in surface preperation on the Ben Moore poly is adequate sanding - removing ALL the shine and scuffing the surface for proper adhesion of the new material.

No caveat as to sanding sealer, poly or lacquer as the previous finish - just proper sanding and cleaning before application of their product.

Dry time to recoat is about 2 hours. Assuming you have the space to work in, 2-3 days ought to do the trick.
 
  #8  
Old 07-20-07, 01:47 PM
Q
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi George

What product should I use to clean the cabinets that are close to the sink and stove before (or after?) sanding?
Is there a way to apply the poly(urethene?), beside brushing on, that would be faster, and better?
Should I do all this outside (except for the bases, of course)?
Thanks for the advice.
 
  #9  
Old 07-21-07, 04:53 AM
George's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Hill, Va. USA
Posts: 2,890
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sanding will go more easily with clean surfaces; I'd use something like Clorox cleanup.

Wipe down after sanding with a damp rag (paint thinner) to remove the sanding dust/debris.

Polyurethane can be applied with a roller. Several of my customers use a 3/16" nap roller when redoing floors. No reason why it shouldn't work on cabinets. As with a brush, the main thing is not to overwork it.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: