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Old 01-30-08, 02:47 PM
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Question advice

Not sure if I am in the right place to post this but here goes.

Would anyone have any advice on how to bid on trim carpentry projects? Are there standard rates like by sq.ft. or anything for trim, cabinets, railings, etc???

Or can anyone point me in the right direction to find this out?


Thanks,
 
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Old 01-30-08, 02:59 PM
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Dave: it's kinda hard to put trim jobs in a can. Each one is different, and will entail alot more or less elaborate art work, for the lack of another term. Plain door casings, window casings with stool, base/shoe can just about be done by the opening. Some here charge that way. But when you get into different types of molding, jamb extensions, is the molding stained or painted, fireplace surrounds, mantels, crown molding, chair rail, stair case trim, all have to be figured into your estimate, and believe me, after doing it for years, it gets more complicated every day. I just have to figure materials on hand, primed and painted or stained, and estimate a rate I can live with while giving the customer a good job, based on a walkthrough and detailed listing of what is to be done. Sorry for the wordy answer, but it ain't simple.
 
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Old 01-30-08, 03:41 PM
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What Chandler said, it ain't simple. There is no right/wrong answer. And more often that not, I bid incorrectly on a job. No house is square/plumb, no walls are straight, some are not bad, some are terrible. You never know until you finish the job. Painted trim can be fixed with caulk, not so with stained trim.

I often use the HomeTech estimating guides to get me in the ball park. Then I fine tune from there. And I always have a disclaimer in my estimate. The estimating guides are usually high, so I look good when I come in under the estimate. They are tailored for a large company with lots of overhead, which I have little.
 
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Old 01-30-08, 07:54 PM
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Thanks for your replies, I have been doing it for a few years and was just looking for some easier way to bid. I never get it right on any job, but never am sure if I am to high or to low. I know there is no exact science to bidding a project, but why must it be so difficult!!
 
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Old 01-31-08, 03:39 AM
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The difficulty comes in with the range of simplicity to the ornate. In our area, we have simple homes that only require base and door/window trim. Bid $35 a hole and you're good (with materials on hand). The next job will have a mantel, crown, chair, speed base, shoe, staircase. Those are the ones you walk through with a calculator and grid pad and ruler. And no two homes are even close to similar.
 
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