faux raised paneling idea

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Old 04-09-08, 01:27 PM
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faux raised paneling idea

Hi guys! here's my plan & let me know if it sounds okay & if you have any tips for me.......

i currently have baseboard, chair rail & crown moulding in my dining room. the previous homeowners, bless their pointy little heads, painted over the wallpaper that was there. the paper must've been on good, cuz the paint job is good except that you can see the seams & tell it's painted wallpaper (classy!). anyway, my plan is to (also) paint above the chair rail (but in a mottled faux texture way, so it'll actually probably look like it's really wallpaper & not paint), but below the chair rail, here's my idea - and i recall seeing this on a tv show years ago: i'm going to buy picture frame moulding & mitre cut the ends so i can attach it to the wall in rectangles to sort of look like raised paneling wainscot, and then paint everything like the rest of the woodwork.

i've put up a chair rail before, but that was using the old mitre saw & box thing. now we have a nice radial mitre saw, so it should go easier this time. i'm not sure, though, if i should glue the moulding up, or nail it somehow or both? & what kind of nails or brads i should use? should i predrill for the nails? and i guess i'll probably need to caulk any gaps between the moulding & the wall? and as for the size & spacing on these rectangles - should i just decide on a rectangle size and then evenly space them around the room?

thanks for any input!
 
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Old 04-09-08, 02:22 PM
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Moulding

An 18 gauge finish nailer should work well. The nail length should be such that the nails penetrate the studs no more than an inch to avoid damage to any electrical wire in the wall.

Spacing is a matter of taste. Will the rectangles be vertical or horizontal?(Will the long dimension be vertical or horizontal?) Experiment with sizes. Measure the distance from the top of the basebaord to the bottom of the chair rail and divide by two. Try the resulting number as the height of the rectangles. (Or divide by 5 and multiply the result by 3 is another possibility)The space between them should be the same as the space along the top or the bottom. Spacing becomes a challenge when the walls in the room are not the same length.
 
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Old 04-09-08, 05:40 PM
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Pre drill if you don't have a nail gun. An adhesive like liquid nail can be handy on the areas that don't have a stud behind them.
 
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Old 04-10-08, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Annette View Post
should glue the moulding up, or nail it somehow or both?
Nailing it should be fine.

Originally Posted by Annette View Post
i guess i'll probably need to caulk any gaps between the moulding & the wall?
Yup

Originally Posted by Annette View Post
and as for the size & spacing on these rectangles - should i just decide on a rectangle size and then evenly space them around the room?
Definitely. The hard way of doing it, though it's possible and will help you better visually is to do the measurements as Wirepuller stated (experiment w/only 1 rectangle of the size of your choice), attach them together (not on the wall) and then hang it loosely on the wall where you think you might want to put it. If you still can't decided if that is right-spacing wise, continue with the other ones.

There's probably electrical sockets somewhere there right? Maybe at least 1? Always keep that in mind and or anything else that might be on that wall that you'd have to work around with too. If there's an electrical socket, try making the rectangles fit on the wall going around it. It just makes it easier. If it looks bad having to go around it, then you'll just have to work with it. Just a little more work but do-able.

Just my thoughts-no expert here
 
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Old 04-10-08, 09:23 AM
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Seen it done, and looked pretty good. Those people put raised patterned paintable wallpaper inside the rectangles, then painted to match the wall.

Only thing I haven't seen mentioned on your plan is, unlikely that the vertical trim pieces will fall directly over studs. (Ahh, I see Mark did mention that now.) Maybe something like PowerGrab for those? Don't know for sure, just throwin some thoughts out.

Also, I'd prime and paint, then come back to touch up after install.
 
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Old 04-10-08, 02:45 PM
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Frames

Construct the frame in the shop or other work area and then attach unit to wall by nailing through the horizontal members at each stud.

Sure would like to see photos of the finished project.
 
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Old 04-11-08, 08:32 PM
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I did this in my home 10 years ago without a brad nailer and I drilled a lot of pilot holes to not split the molding. I used some plain old Elmer's white glue and about 3 nails per piece; caulked afterwards and all is well since.
If you have Excel, I can send you a spreadsheet that calculates the spacing between "panels". Let me know.
 
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Old 04-14-08, 10:27 AM
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wow guys, thanks! actually, i do have outlets on each wall, so i'll consider that when planning placement.

i hadn't thought of pre-making the rectangles & then attaching it as a unit. would that be easier than afixing each piece on the wall? not sure i could get all 4 pieces attached at the corner & not have it rack all out of kilter...

and i don't have a nailer - just a drill i can predrill with and a hammer! and a nail set, of course, to counter sink & fill.

and since the mouldings will be painted the same as the wall, i'll just paint it all once it's up.

i'm just glad to know no one adamantly objected to this!
 
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Old 04-14-08, 11:51 AM
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Panels

Unless you can have them all land on a stud, you will not have anything to attach the vertical members of the panels. This why I suggested prebuilding the panels. Cut the pieces with a mitre saw and build jig if you need to in order to get a good fit at each corner.

The spredsheet mentioned above seems like a great way to get the correct spacing.

Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 04-17-08, 10:08 AM
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okay then, what would you say the success/failure rate would be if i ONLY used liquid nails (or some sort of adhesive) and no nails at all? just glue up each piece to the wall and glue on the mitered corners? that would "work", wouldn't it?

i mean, what's the point of messing with finding joints to nail into, if only the horizontal pieces are nailed in anyway?

lastly, if i were to preassemble rectangular frames, would i only use glue on the corners or something else or additionally? isn't there a zigzaggy little metal thing you can hammer into both pieces to hold them together?
 
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Old 04-17-08, 10:32 AM
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I wouldn't just liquid nail it. Don't know what success/failure rate would be, but it's something definitely not worth attempting nor trying or recommended (as far as I know from experience-not a pro here). I have NEVER seen it just liquid nailed. What are ya gonna do...? Hold it there 'til it dries? j/k

Another option is to nail it to the wall. Just use 1 nail. Fit it, move it, look at it on the wall. Shouldn't be to hard to figure out where you really want to put it. At least a couple nails on the wall is easy to fix/patch up. Removing it and moving it around would be easy. Just remember to use only 1 nail where ya need.

Ask your DH to get you a nail gun! I know, I know...it's quite costly if you're only planing on using it once, but it's an awesome tool that I should've gotten a long time ago when I did my baseboards. I see myself wanting and needing it more.

As for the preassemble part, not sure if this is a great suggestion (could be dangerous w/a nailgun) but I've attached the pieces w/the nailgun. Seen someone do it a million times that way and at the same time always tells me NEVER to do it that way. I guess I shouldn't be telling you this!!! Liquid nail should work. I would think a staple gun would work too depending on how thick you pieces are. Staple from behind.

I'm sure the real pros here can help better but I just had to give my 2 cents!
 
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Old 04-17-08, 03:46 PM
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Generally the 'squares' are preassembled with the joints glued and nailed. I couldn't image doing this without a nail gun. Harbor freight has some cheap nail guns while not pro quality are probably good enough for the average diyer - they do require an air compressor.

If they are preassembled you can apply a little liquid nail or caulking on the side pieces and nail the top and bottoms to the studs. That along with caulking the wood to the wall makes for a good secure fit.
 
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Old 04-17-08, 06:03 PM
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I did it without a nail gun: tape measure, level, trusty old hammer, finishing nails, nail set, and some Elmer's wood glue, and caulk for gaps and edge sealing. Since I've got dry wall and couldn't always hit a stud, I usually put 3 nails in each piece: one at each end and one in the middle. It was slow but worked. I've a brad nailer now and could fly through it but would still use the glue (God forbid I ever want to remove them though!).
Just paint the moldings with your finish coat before you mount them; it makes it a lot easier only having to do touch up.
 
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Old 04-21-08, 10:45 AM
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okay, FINE! i'll use glue AND a few pre-drilled finish nails!

thanks again for the tips!
 
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Old 04-22-08, 08:02 AM
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I used a hot glue gun (w/ wood glue) and brads for the frames (shelf cap moulding). I used 5" between frames and baseboards, chair rails, other frames, corners (make 5" blocks to easily establish spacing). The frames were approx 30" wide (2 studs per box). I used a nailer and 2.5" finish nails. The walls will not be perfectly flat, so use caulk/adhesive to fill in any gaps (dry fit and look for gaps, apply caulk before nailing).

The hardest part is keeping everything level, plumb and even spacing. Check existing baseboards and chair rail before you start making boxes.
 
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Old 09-29-08, 08:38 AM
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chris:

so you kept the spacing at a constant 5" and allowed the frames to vary slightly? you say you kept all your frames approx 30" wide, so what was your smallest & largest box?

i'm having trouble deciding when to use one larger frame vs when to use 2 smaller frames for some spaces. what's the rule?

here are my spaces in inches:

32
32
42.5
49
52
52
125

because of my outlets, i'll be using 3 3/4" spacing. so i know that on my smallest spaces (32) my frames will be 24.5 wide, and all the heights will be 18" tall.

i know on the 49" space, i'll use 2 frames 18.875" wide. and the 52" space, i'll use 2 frames 20.375" wide. but on the 42.5 space, do i want to use one 35" wide frame, or 2 15.625" skinny frames? what's the rule of thumb? do i, maybe, want to keep all the frames wider than tall? or is it okay to have some frames wider & some skinnier? or maybe because on that wall, there's a doorway in the (almost) middle, leaving 49 on one side and 42.5 on the other side, so maybe i should have 2 frames on each side. would it be weird to have one frame on one side, and 2 frames on the other?
 

Last edited by Annette; 09-29-08 at 09:33 AM.
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Old 10-02-08, 10:31 AM
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Annette,

One suggestion for visulizing the final project before even cutting any trim might be to lay out all of your rectangles under the chair rail using blue painters tape. Then you can step back and view it from a few angles to see if meets your expectations.
 
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