Sliding vs. Chop Mitre Saw

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Old 04-26-08, 08:06 AM
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Sliding vs. Chop Mitre Saw

Okay....here's a question: Price being equal ($199 + taxes), would you opt for an all singing, all dancing Ryobi Sliding compound mitre saw (10"), or a DeWalt Chop saw that doesn't come with muc h beyond the saw (clamps and whatnot extra).

The Ryobi is http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/s...k=P_PartNumber

and the DeWalt is the DW703 (can't find it on homedepot.ca anymore)....which is an older model being replaced by the DW713.

The last option is a Rigid for $229 which scored real well on Consumer Reports.

Thanks for any advice/tips. I want a strong saw that's good and accurate (ie: when I cut 22.5 deg, I get 22.5 deg, not 22.5 deg-ish), but I really, really don't want to end up kicking myself for not getting the sliding option that comes with the Ryobi. Keep in m ind too my budget's rather limited.

Oh....most of the work I'll do is, granted, rough work (cutting 2x4's and general carpentry), but there will be times I'll be doing finishing work and would like the accuracy.

Thanks
 
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Old 04-26-08, 08:23 AM
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Look at what you anticipate cutting. Is there a lot of material that the sliding saw can cut but the other will not? Also, you said chop saw in your post, but the kind of saw you should be considering based on the needs you listed is a compound miter saw, not a chop saw - I'm guessing you mixed up the terms, not the saws, though.
 
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Old 04-26-08, 08:24 AM
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Hauger...ok this is just my opinion, so we're clear.

The Ryobi would probably be fine for the occasional user, as in maybe 3-4 times a year, trim a door here, trim a room there, etc. If yer planning on maybe building a deck, or a shed, I think you'd be better off with a 12" Dewalt. Don't know if the model you mentioned was a 12" or not.

That said, I have a Rigid laser 10" and I'm quite happy with it for the trim work I do, and the fact I only paid about $95.

I don't think I would be as happy trying to build a deck or a shed with mine, as I used my neighbors 12" Dewalt for that, and I know the performance differences.

12" are more powerful and a little more versatile, also heavier to move and cost more.

10" are lighter and adequate for most jobs, but sometimes just aren't enuf tool for heavy use.

Now, lets see what people who do it for a living say.
 
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Old 04-26-08, 09:38 AM
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Thanks for the answers. Yeah, I mixed up the terms, not the saws....the DeWalt is a compound mitre, not a chop saw. I agree, for the money, a 12" is the way to go, but the price difference for the extra 2" is anywhere from $100 to $200, which is a lot of extra $$ to talk my wife into letting me spend

The jobs I have planned for the immediate future are as follows:

1. Build a custom valance for some blinds we've put up in our bay window. This, of course, is a finishing piece which requires 2 90 deg angles and 2 45's, and, well, I'm a bit uptight and I really want the angles of the cuts to match perfect....I don't want to be out a half deg. and have the entire thing look "not quite right".

2. Build a workbench in the garage (either 64" long or 96" long). The plan is to use 4x4's for the legs, either 2x4's or 2x6's for the framing (not sure if 2x4's are enough or if 2x6's are over engineering), and 2 x10's for the tabletop (with a removable top on top). I know I can't cut the 2x10's with the DeWalt, but others have said they can cut the 2x6's with it.

3. Take down some drywall, put up some better strapping to build and support a cabinet to hide our electrical panel.

So....really, there's one project where I'm really going to be picky on the finish. The rest are kind of rough-ins, sort of. Other than that, the house is pretty well trimmed and has brand new hardwood flooring, so I don't see too many major projects in the near future.

Again...thanks for the advice, I really appreciate it.
 
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Old 04-26-08, 12:45 PM
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Hey:
I have a Delta compound miter saw and love it..have used it on several projects, but I found it has some limitations.. I am making some planterts and using 2x10's.. It will not cross cut them, so I had to make a jig, cut them all but about 1" and then turn the board over to finish the cut.. Kinda a pain, but that was all I could do. If I were buying today, I would go with the sliding compound saw.

God luck and let us know what you decide.

Take care
Dan
 
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Old 04-26-08, 02:35 PM
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Saw

I have a Dewalt 10 inch. It will cross-cut a 5 1/2 inch wide board, but that is its limit width-wise. If you want to cut wider that that, you will need to go to a slider or a 12 inch model.
 
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Old 04-26-08, 02:59 PM
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Hi all,

I have both 12", the sliding compound miter and the regular miter, both DeWalt. I like the sliding compound so much better, it's so much smoother, that the regular compound miter mostly sits in the corner, lonely, I'm sure. The sliding saw never burns a bevel, either. So, I keep the rough cut blade on the regular compound, and use it primarily for 2x4's and the finish blade on the slide saw, and use it for fine trim.

My regular compound is 7 years old and the slide saw is 3 years old. Neither have required any service, except the older saw needed a kerf plate, less than $10.00.

I also have the miter saw stand, and must say it's tricky to get the sliding compound saw on the rails by yourself.

Lest you think these saws haven't had much use, We've replaced every single piece of trim (doors, windows, baseboards, ceiling moldings) with stain grade oak, built a fireplace surround and mantle, put in a whole new kitchen, and drag them around to Habitat sites. (Although, I don't let any amateurs use them )

Connie
 
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Old 04-26-08, 04:49 PM
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I have a DeWalt 12" compound. I'm happy with it. If I have to crosscut something beyond it's capacity (verrrrry rare), I use a circular saw and a fence.

If I were buiying a new miter saw it would be a 12" slider and it wouldn't be Ryobi.
 
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Old 04-26-08, 05:12 PM
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Just for the sake of changing brands, I use a Bosch 12" compound miter saw on a daily basis. It is mounted on a Delta rolling table. I like the ambidextrous safety, 31.6 right and left 33.9 bevel for cutting crown (found on most better saws).
 
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Old 04-26-08, 07:21 PM
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Chandler! Bosch??? I wish! Jeez you make too much money!
 
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Old 04-27-08, 09:46 AM
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Well, turns out I'm too skittish about inexpensive stuff with usually expensive options. The Ryobi seemed too good to be true, and I chickened out, figuring the chances of getting a mediocre saw with lots of options was too big, and ended up opting for the DeWalt. Anyways, pulled it out of the box and went through the calibration procedure, turns out the factory setting were all bang on. Did some basic cuts with it, and I've gotta say, I'm hooked. The only thing I wish I had was the slide, but really, when most 10" slides cost $400, makes me wonder what you'll get from a model that has one for $200.

Thanks again for the opinions though.
 
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Old 04-27-08, 06:02 PM
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I think you made the right decision. I have a Dewalt and have been very happy with it for years. My admittedly limited experience with Ryobi has not been positive.
 
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Old 04-27-08, 07:58 PM
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Vic, you'll scream louder when you hear how much I paid for it. I was at the ORange big box store one day, and they had this saw sitting in the Recon area. I asked about it and they said it was used one Saturday for the kid's bird house thing, and they couldn't put it back on the shelf. I asked how much, thinking in my mind "I ain't paying over $250 for this thing". When he came back and asked if I'd give $180 for it, well.......The blade was worth $70. I hate taking advantage of people like that.
 
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Old 04-27-08, 09:01 PM
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Geez Larry..that sounds like me..and I used to work at that box. Course, mine didn't have the nicer stuff like that. We didn't even have the Bosch hammer drills. I had to score on Rigid, Porter-Cable and Dewalt.

Good on Ya!!
 
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