how warm does it have to be?

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Old 03-02-09, 10:06 AM
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how warm does it have to be?

I live in Omaha, NE. I have a bunch of pine boards that I've sanded and are ready to be finished. However, today it's 23 degrees Fahrenheit and I don't have a garage to do this in. I need to do my staining on my balcony. How warm does it need to be? Does it just need to be above freezing (32)?

The stuff I'm using is this: Minwax PlolyShades Stain & Polyurethane in 1 step, Bombay Mahogany Gloss 480.

Also, last time I used this stuff, I had some troubles with it getting really goopy and thicker as I used up the can. What should I do to avoid that?
 
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Old 03-02-09, 12:11 PM
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Check the can(s) for temp recommendations however rule of thumb is above 50 degrees.

Sounds like you need to be regularly stirring your cans.If this is occurring in already opened then stored cans there might have been some evaporation.Stir gently and no shaking so you avoid bubbling.
 
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Old 03-02-09, 02:42 PM
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This is Nebraska. I'm unlikely to get any 50 degree weather soon. Could I get by with 40?
 
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Old 03-02-09, 03:14 PM
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Your results will be inferior if you don't follow the temperature suggestions on the can. And I, too, think it is a minimum of 50 degrees. Can you lay down drop cloths and do it inside on saw horses?
 
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Old 03-02-09, 04:38 PM
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You mght get away with keeping the boards inside untill you are ready to stain them, carry them outside just long enough to apply the stain and then bring them back inside. Substrate temp is more important than air temp so if the boards are still relatively warm when you stain them and then bring them back into a heated space - it should be ok. Not the best way to stain them but it should do ok.

The poly should also be stored at room temp. Oil base coatings will thicken up with the cold and will be harder to apply. The polyshades should be stirred well before using and restirrred oasionally if needed. Not sealing the can well when done can also cause the poly to thicken.
 
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Old 03-02-09, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Your results will be inferior if you don't follow the temperature suggestions on the can. And I, too, think it is a minimum of 50 degrees. Can you lay down drop cloths and do it inside on saw horses?
I don't think I could get away with doing it inside. It's a one bedroom apartment and I have very little room. I think I would make an awful mess.

Actually, the can doesn't specify any temperature guidelines. It's March and the worst of winter should be over. I guess it's not impossible that I could get lucky and get a 50 degree day. It was 28 today, but I took the temperature on my balcony later in the day and it had gone up to 39.
 
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Old 03-02-09, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
You mght get away with keeping the boards inside untill you are ready to stain them, carry them outside just long enough to apply the stain and then bring them back inside. Substrate temp is more important than air temp so if the boards are still relatively warm when you stain them and then bring them back into a heated space - it should be ok. Not the best way to stain them but it should do ok.

The poly should also be stored at room temp. Oil base coatings will thicken up with the cold and will be harder to apply. The polyshades should be stirred well before using and restirrred oasionally if needed. Not sealing the can well when done can also cause the poly to thicken.
That's not a bad idea. Maybe I could let them set outside for maybe an hour so I know they won't drip, then bring them inside onto cloths.
 
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Old 03-03-09, 03:44 AM
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You must paint like one of my helpers! I dip my brush and paint all day with about 1" of paint soaking up the bristles. My helper paints for 10 minutes and the paint soaks up to his elbows. I guess his theory more is better. Good luck with the project!
 
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Old 03-03-09, 05:07 AM
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. "Maybe I could let them set outside for maybe an hour so I know they won't drip, then bring them inside onto cloths"

Unless it's 40 degrees and in the sun, I wouldn't leave them outside that long. Cold temps slow and even sometimes stop the drying process.

Chandler, I hate to get paint on me - especially on my hands but I can work on an old car/truck, get grease from head to toe and it doesn't bother me too much
 
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Old 03-03-09, 07:28 AM
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If you won't brush it inside, it's supposed to be 59F on Thursday, so if you can, do it that afternoon. If you have 2 ladders, set them up inside the house, about 7' apart. You'll be able to put a LOT of wood on one pair of ladders. Put a drop cloth down on the floor first. Have all your wood inside (today!) so that it is warm for at least 72 hours. Take one piece outside at a time and brush it. Then bring it back inside (carry it with latex gloves on, one hand on the end, one hand underneath. It should not be so wet that it drips, if it does you have applied the stuff too thick. Brush it out as thin as you can as you apply it.) Set each piece on the rungs of the ladder. You need to be sure you aren't going to have any drips coming off the bottom edge of one piece, and dripping on another... so you should probably carefully wipe the bottom edges with rags, just to make sure. When I set trim on ladders, I start loading them from the bottom, up.
 
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Old 03-06-09, 12:20 AM
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Thanx for the help, everyone. On Wednesday I had the morning off and was lucky and that I got 49 degrees. Close enough! I got it all done and it looks nice. Thanks.
 
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