Ridge Beam Support

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Old 03-31-09, 09:25 AM
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Ridge Beam Support

My log home plans say to support the ridge beam at the ends with a 3-inch Schedule 40 steel pipe. Haven't done the exact calculations yet, but these supports will be around 14 feet long. Where would I find such a thing? The big box stores have plenty of support posts, but none longer than about 9 feet.
 
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Old 03-31-09, 10:00 AM
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Pipe

Use a coupling to join 2 pieces.
 
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Old 03-31-09, 10:26 AM
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OK, never thought of that one.
 
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Old 03-31-09, 01:23 PM
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I think, too, the instructions may have been referring from the top log to the peak of the ridge. Is that 14' as well? As Ken says, join two together, but remember you must allow for adjustment. In your case you will have to lengthen the pipe 3" or so over the life of the house due to the settling of the log walls (if as asked earlier it is resting on the last log). Make provisions for that in increments.
 
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Old 03-31-09, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
, but remember you must allow for adjustment. In your case you will have to lengthen the pipe 3" or so over the life of the house due to the settling of the log walls (if as asked earlier it is resting on the last log). Make provisions for that in increments.
I am not getting this. If I don't, I'm sure other curious readers of the forum do not. An adjustable support for a ridge beam? I don't understand. You mean someone after the house is built is going to jack up the ridge in increments every once in a while? ??? What is the "life of the house"(going to be)? How does anybody know? Educate me, on this one. Thanks.
 
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Old 03-31-09, 04:13 PM
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I've never heard of any sort of support like this, either. My caution was regarding the need for adjustment over the life (first 3 years, especially) of the house. Log home walls shrink up to 3", just like studs do, except they are on their side and it affects the height of the walls, literally. Interior walls must be "let down" in increments according to the shrinking of the outside walls or you'll break your wall covering. Special bolts are installed on the interior support walls to accommodate this. Interior support walls aren't attached to the framing above. Think about a Colorado basement, upside down. Even your doors and windows aren't attached to the logs. They are placed in position using splines, so the logs can settle around them. Different animal, for sure. I am equally curious about the ridge support. Surely this is a temporary support until the gable framing is accomplished.
 
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Old 03-31-09, 05:26 PM
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Huh. This is all new to me. I don't know anything about loghome building.

With what you say being true, I wonder how many people that have log homes, that have outside wall heights that become different from inside wall heights, wind up taking off and scratching their head, when they see that their house is bending over time?

You learn something new every day.
 
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Old 03-31-09, 07:03 PM
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You can get long steel columns from a steel supplier in your area.

Hi Chandler, I have never heard of anything like this. My father and I built a log home for my Aunt 20 or so years ago and did not do any of the things you describe. They have never had any problems. Maybe this is a different product than what we built. Her logs were milled with a dado on bottom and a tongue on top to lock them together.

Bill
 
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Old 04-01-09, 05:23 AM
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This is my second log home. The use of adjustable support posts and special framing techniques differs among the various brands of log homes and their log "systems." In my current case, the logs are kiln dried and it is a single-story house. The walls are expected to shrink only about a inch or less.

As for the ridge beam supports, the applicable measurement is from the top of the top log to the underside of the ridge beam. And they are not temporary - they will be enclosed within the gable end framing. They also do not need any adjustment capability.

Everything said about installing the doors and windows is true. Also, every interior wall that connects to the log walls uses a gusset stud with slots that is attached using lag bolts. This allows the logs to shrink down without affecting the wall.
 
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Old 04-01-09, 07:31 AM
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I can surely tell that the moral of the story regarding log homes is that you just can't employ any old (even excellent)contractor to build yor log home, who has no prior knowledge of log homes. And to anyone who plans on doing their own - I guess one has a lot of reading up to do, before starting. That, and/or some serious discussions with the supplier of the log components of the home.
 
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Old 04-01-09, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by ecman51` View Post
I can surely tell that the moral of the story regarding log homes is that you just can't employ any old (even excellent)contractor to build yor log home, who has no prior knowledge of log homes. And to anyone who plans on doing their own - I guess one has a lot of reading up to do, before starting. That, and/or some serious discussions with the supplier of the log components of the home.
All true. We had a contractor (and not a very good one LOL) build our first log home in 1986 but are doing the current one ourselves (literally, my wife and I are doing everything). The only thing we've contracted out so far is the foundation. Besides it being my 10th house, I'm a retired engineer so am used to reading blueprints and such.
 
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