Painting MDF... Please critique my materials

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Old 04-06-09, 08:21 AM
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Painting MDF... Please critique my materials

Alright. I'm ready to build my MDF coffee table! After a not-so-quick trip to the hardware store I came back with:

3/4"/19mm MDF boards
Kilz Original (Interior Oil-Based)
Zinsser B-I-N Primer
Rust-Oleum Flat Black Oil-Based Paint
Zinsser Shellac!

100, 220, 320 sandpaper

So... did I pickup a good arsenal for painting MDF?

My goal is to do a high-gloss MDF finish not unlike this (though that probably was covered in glass). And, for the recorc, I want to sand/smooth/spackle over where the boards of the table meet so it looks like one smooth cube.

So... in what order do I need to apply this stuff to get a high-gloss finish? Do I need to pick up anything else?

Could anyone give me a simple rundown of what I have to do and what order I have to apply/sand stuff?

I would be very grateful.

Thanks all!
 
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Old 04-06-09, 02:44 PM
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I have found that using a mixture of 50% wood glue and 50% water on any cut edges makes the painting easier. I apply this mixture once, let it dry, sand it then do it again.

Bill
 
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Old 04-06-09, 04:33 PM
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Why all the different primers?

Any one of those primers will do ok but since it is going to be black, I'd be tempted to skip the primer and use the flat black [thinned 10%] for the primer coat. I'd sand that coat and reapply the black. Apply and sand your spackle first, reapply if needed after the 1st coat.

You will need gloss black for your finish coats. How do you intend to apply the paint? Spraying will give you the slickest finish.
 
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Old 04-06-09, 07:38 PM
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Hey marksr,

As far as the paint goes, I got matte black paint and was planning on brushing it on (figuring that aerosol cans would give an uneven finish). I understand it is matte but I figured putting Shellac over it would turn it glossy. No?

Thanks for the suggestion about just applying the matte black. I'll give that a shot.
 
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Old 04-07-09, 04:01 AM
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Lightbulb

Ya, it's hard to get even coverage and a full coat with aersol cans. Ideally you would spray the black with a cup gun. Be sure to sand [and dust] between each coat to help eliminate most of the brush marks.

I've not used much clear shellac. I don't know if it would be compatible with the oil black but do know that polyurathane would dry to a harder film [more protection] Adding a clear finish over the color coat could complicate any touch up of needed. IMO a top coat[s] of gloss black would give a better finish.
 
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Old 04-07-09, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Ya, it's hard to get even coverage and a full coat with aersol cans. Ideally you would spray the black with a cup gun. Be sure to sand [and dust] between each coat to help eliminate most of the brush marks.

I've not used much clear shellac. I don't know if it would be compatible with the oil black but do know that polyurathane would dry to a harder film [more protection] Adding a clear finish over the color coat could complicate any touch up of needed. IMO a top coat[s] of gloss black would give a better finish.

Awesome. Thanks for the tip. So you think something like this: High Gloss Enamel Paint

Would be my best bet (over matte + schellac coats)?

My only question is, since I have to brush it, how sure could I be that it will come out even and not require sanding? Obviously if the gloss and the paint are combined, I wouldn't be able to sand out any inconsistencies, right?
 
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Old 04-07-09, 01:34 PM
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Thinning the paint a little and using a good quality brush will help you get less brush marks. Sanding between coats should remove any brush marks from the previous coat.

It is harder to eliminate brush marks with latex enamel. I've not used much Behr coatings but their reputation isn't the best. You will find better coatings at your local paint store. I'd recomend using an oil base enamel. Oil base coatings dry to a harder film than their latex coun terparts.
 
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Old 04-07-09, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Thinning the paint a little and using a good quality brush will help you get less brush marks. Sanding between coats should remove any brush marks from the previous coat.

It is harder to eliminate brush marks with latex enamel. I've not used much Behr coatings but their reputation isn't the best. You will find better coatings at your local paint store. I'd recomend using an oil base enamel. Oil base coatings dry to a harder film than their latex coun terparts.
Ok! Great! Last question...

So the final process of painting should be something like:

1.) Seal the edges with wood filler, sand to smooth. Repeat until done.
2.) Prime with Kilz, sand, repeat 2 or 3 times
3.) Paint with gloss black oil based enamel until satisfied.

Yes?

Thank you so much for your help so far.
 
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Old 04-08-09, 04:59 AM
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As long as you have everything coated, 1 coat of primer should be sufficent. If you sand thru the primer a 2nd coat wouldn't hurt. Don't forget to sand between coats of black enamel.
 
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Old 04-08-09, 05:26 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
As long as you have everything coated, 1 coat of primer should be sufficent. If you sand thru the primer a 2nd coat wouldn't hurt. Don't forget to sand between coats of black enamel.
Thanks SO much for your help, marksr!
 
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