OK to cut out attic studs on gable end of roof

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Old 04-11-09, 05:19 PM
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OK to cut out attic studs on gable end of roof

I put on addition and need to gain better access for the HVAC inspector. the old house roof was built with rafters but no ridge beam-they meet at the ridge where they are both cut at 45 (the pitch is 12/12). On the gable ends there is a stud right under the ridge and then there are studs 24" OC out from there. The new house is set back 1' and the roof is built with trusses with the same pitch in front. To get better access, I would like to cut out the studs in old attic. I can't see where they are needed, other than to support the old siding. they go from top plate to the end rafter. obviously all the other rafters, besides the end ones, do not have anything under them. Do the studs provide any kind of lateral restraint? or are they just for supporting the siding? the new truss sits right next to the rafters, and I could connect them together if that would be desireable. they actually already are in some areas, but because of the setback of new addition and the fact that old house is only 15' front to back (the direction of rafters and trusses) and addition is 30' front to back, they don't line up everywhere. the front section of truss sits lower than the rafter, but near ridge the truss ends up overlapping the rear rafter. probably need picture, but it is dark now.
 
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Old 04-11-09, 09:26 PM
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They were there for shear on the gable end wall/roof, and roof termination at the gable across the roof deck. I would nail the trusses to the rafters wherever possible. Remove only as much ply sheathing from the gable walls as necessary for the subs. How are you adressing the old house wall? As you said, leave the studs under the top center. You wouldn't want the load of the gable wall to be carried by the new truss unless it was rated for that. If the sheathing is off the rafters above the truss line, nail some blocking for siding backing to the tops of the rafters. Then reinstall the sheathing for siding. On the other plane (truss over rafters) nail blocking for siding backing. Be safe, GBR
 
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Old 04-12-09, 04:28 PM
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well the sheathing is already gone! Actually, there wasn't any sheathing. The house was built in 1900 and it had 5" wood dutch lap siding directly on the studs. Most of it is off. I prefer for it to be off to open the two attics up to each other. The old house doesn't have adequate ridge venting in my opinion. I argued with the roofer that they should have cut the opening bigger in ridge. I was hoping to create more open area between the two attics to help with ventilation. There was a gap between the old siding and the new trusses. If I really want to tie the rafters and trusses together, I think it would be best to cut something to fit snugly in the gap between the two and then nail or trusslok it to the rafter and the truss. Here are some pics.

front view-old house on right. new house begins at metal roof. Note that there isn't any siding needed above the rafters. The overhang of old roof sits on top of the new roof sheathing.





rear view-old house on left. the area in question is the 12/12 pitch roof where it meets the new large roof on the right. note that in back the new roof is higher than the old roof, wheres is front the new is lower.



view from new attic looking into old attic. the front is on the right. You see the rear rafter sitting below the rear section of the truss. the peak of new roof is right above the vertical section of the truss. near here is where the truss and rafters cross each other and are tied together.



from inside old attic looking into new attic. the front is on the left. note old rafter sitting just above the new truss. note the roof sheathing for new roof just below the rafter



another view as above except a little wider angle. Note the platform with pry bar. That is my access to heat pump in the old attic. The stud that is under the peak is right in my way! better view of this on last photo.





so I really need to cut out the stud in center to get a 24" access. I put up platform on the trusses and it had to be 24" and I had to go up until I got a 24" wide space. But the center stud falls about 8" from edge of this space.

regarding my old wall-the siding has been removed and is down to bare studs and will have drywall put on it as it is now going to be an interior wall-my stairway.
 
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Old 04-12-09, 05:10 PM
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I'm amazed there is no ridge board. I would nail a 2x4 across each rafter to act as collar ties, to hold the rafters together close to their opposite tops, about 4-5' down. Then take out the center stud. Here is some info on ventilation, the brain is like a sponge:

BSD-012: Moisture Control for New Residential Buildings —

Energy Savers: Vapor Barriers or Vapor Diffusion Retarders

Be safe, GBR
 
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Old 04-12-09, 08:57 PM
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so you mean make the rafters look like an "A" with the new 2x4 being the horizontal section? or do you suggest I run one 2x4 across all the rafters in "front" and one across all the rafters in "rear"? Did you mean 4-5" (not 4-5')?

should I try to tie truss to rafter by cutting "spacer" to fit between them and then nailing or bolting it to both the rafter and truss?

Yeh, like I said, it was built in 1900. It is balloon framed, uses true 2x lumber. I can't believe the way the 2nd floor joists are supported. maybe this is usual for balloon framing? they cut a notch approx 1" deep and 6" high into the studs. then face nailed a 1x6 into these notches. then put 2x8 joist on top of the 1x6. the joists are placed right next to the studs, but I don't think they are connected. doesn't look very great-but has stood for 109 years. Once I get to ripping out the drop ceiling that someone put in before, I will get better look. maybe try to tie the joist to the stud, although putting in lag or trusslok may create place for splitting. I did have the framers oversize an LVL that runs on the wall where old and new meet. There is 9" of this LVL hanging down below the bottom of the old joists so that I can attach another LVL to it perpendicularly. the second LVL will go under the center of the joists in old house to help support them-- a span of nearly 16' with 2x8 is pretty bouncey.
 
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